neophobia


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ne·o·pho·bi·a

(nē'ō-fō'bē-ă),
Morbid aversion to, or dread of, novelty or the unknown.
[neo- + G. phobos, fear]

neophobia

Morbid fear of newness, anything new.

neophobia

(ne?o-fo'be-a) [? + phobos, fear]
Fear of new scenes or novelties; aversion to all that is unknown or not understood. Synonym: kainophobia
References in periodicals archive ?
Faith and his team also examined the relationship between food neophobia and body fat measures in both parent and child.
According to Tuorila, Laahtenmaki, Pohjalainen and Lotti (2001), food neophobia is individual, although cultural and socio-economic influences have been reported in the literature.
Research in rats linked neophobia to early separation from Mom, but experiments found no such link for parrots.
In other words, prenatal exposure to BPA was apparently responsible for an increased neophobia in adolescent female rats.
7) Henry Hazlitt, another contributor, characterized the New Humanism as "little more than a rationalization of neophobia and a piece of special pleading for the genteel tradition.
In case studies of two adults with food neophobia, their eating difficulties in adulthood were traced back to early childhood (Marcontell et al.
In mice, an age-related CNS disorder characterized by agitation, neophobia, seizures, inactivity, diminished cerebral glucose utilization, cortico-limbic gliosis, and death, develops.
When Macdonald and his colleagues compared neophobia in wild and enclosure rats, they found that overall the wild farm rats were more food neophobic.
These include: an aversion to texture, where lumpy foods are rejected; an aversion to certain tastes where particular food types are refused; or in severe cases neophobia, where there is an inability to introduce any new foods into the diet.
Such a procedure would not only increase the number of IDMTS relations in the cumulative history--perhaps refining discrimination skills--but also potentially minimize problems of neophobia or neo-philia (ICastak and Schusterman 1994).
These findings are consistent with previous literature on neophobia that suggests that children are less apt to like food with which they are unfamiliar.