neonatal conjunctivitis


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conjunctivitis

 [kon-junk″tĭ-vi´tis]
inflammation of the conjunctiva; it may be caused by bacteria or a virus, or by allergic, chemical, or physical factors. Its infectious form (of bacterial or viral origin) is highly contagious. See also pinkeye.
acute contagious conjunctivitis a contagious inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by Haemophilus aegypticus; secretions must be handled with extreme care to prevent its spread. Popularly known as pinkeye.
acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis a highly contagious form due to infection with enteroviruses.
gonococcal conjunctivitis (gonorrheal conjunctivitis) a severe form caused by infection with gonococci, marked by greatly swollen conjunctivae and eyelids with a profuse purulent discharge. In newborns it is bilateral, acquired from an infected maternal vaginal passage. In adults it is usually unilateral and is acquired by autoinoculation into the eye of other gonococcal infections, such as urethritis, either in oneself or in another person. Called also gonorrheal ophthalmia.
inclusion conjunctivitis a type of conjunctivitis primarily affecting newborn infants, caused by a strain of Chlamydia trachomatis, beginning as an acute purulent form and leading to papillary hypertrophy of the palpebral conjunctiva.
neonatal conjunctivitis ophthalmia neonatorum.

oph·thal·mi·a ne·o·na·to·rum

a conjunctival inflammation occurring within the first 10 days of life; causative agents include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis.

neonatal conjunctivitis

neonatal conjunctivitis

Ophthalmia neonatorum Inflammation of the newborn conjunctiva acquired during passage through the birth canal, usually bacterial–eg, gonococcal or chlamydial, but also herpetic infection Prophylaxis Formerly, silver nitrate, now, antibiotic drops

oph·thal·mi·a ne·o·na·to·rum

(of-thal'mē-ă nē-ō'nā-tō'rŭm)
A conjunctival inflammation occurring within the first 10 days of life; causes include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis.
Synonym(s): infantile purulent conjunctivitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Herpes simplex virus-2 may lead to neonatal conjunctivitis passing through the birth canal, though rarely (20).
In a study performed in Turkey in which the current status in prophylactic treatment of neonatal conjunctivitis was analysed in 24 universities and 24 public hospitals, the most commonly used two drugs were reported to be gentamycine and tobramycine, whereas povidon-iode was reported not to be used (24).
5% solution, a broad spectrum antimicrobial, which is being developed for the prevention of neonatal conjunctivitis in the 3.

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