needlestick injuries

needlestick injuries

accidental skin punctures resulting from contact with hypodermic syringe needles, IV cannula stylets, needles used to "piggyback" IV infusions, and needles used for drawing blood or administering parenteral injections. The contact may occur accidentally during efforts to inject a patient or as a result of carelessly touching discarded medical waste. Such injuries can be dangerous, particularly if the needle has been used in treatment of a patient with a severe blood-borne infection, such as human immunodeficiency virus. To prevent injuries, used needles are not capped or broken and are disposed of in a rigid puncture-resistant container located near the site of use.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study conducted in 2004, Sharp and needlestick injuries are the main occupational accidents and risks that medical personnel are exposed to at a rate of 80% (2).
The needlestick injuries not only impact the quality of health-care service offered but also the safety and health of the nurses.
With increased scrutiny and regulation to prevent the spread of bloodborne infectious diseases, there is an urgent need to develop and implement safer injection systems such as these to better prevent needlestick injuries across the entire healthcare ecosystem.
The World Health Organization estimates that of the 35 million healthcare workers around the world, two million people suffer accidental needlestick injuries each year.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that each year healthcare workers incur 2m accidental needlestick injuries that may result in infections with hepatitis B and C, HIV and other diseases1.
The organization is pressing for the introduction of adequate safety-engineered devices and providing education and techniques designed to make needlestick injuries a "never event.
The NovaGuard SA system technology is designed to reduce the risk of needlestick injuries around staked-needle pre-filled syringe systems.
Reducing nursing needlestick injuries in haemodialysis clinics: a quality improvement program.
gave presentation on factors of Needlestick Injuries with data to control the Needlestick Injuries.
Approximately 80 percent of needlestick injuries can be prevented, according to ISIPS Executive Director Ron Stoker.
Visit the Safe Needles Save Lives page on Nursing-World for fact sheets, nurse and employer toolkits, varied resources on keeping nurses safe from needlestick injuries, see the video and more.