needlestick injuries

needlestick injuries

accidental skin punctures resulting from contact with hypodermic syringe needles, IV cannula stylets, needles used to "piggyback" IV infusions, and needles used for drawing blood or administering parenteral injections. The contact may occur accidentally during efforts to inject a patient or as a result of carelessly touching discarded medical waste. Such injuries can be dangerous, particularly if the needle has been used in treatment of a patient with a severe blood-borne infection, such as human immunodeficiency virus. To prevent injuries, used needles are not capped or broken and are disposed of in a rigid puncture-resistant container located near the site of use.
References in periodicals archive ?
With increased scrutiny and regulation to prevent the spread of bloodborne infectious diseases, there is an urgent need to develop and implement safer injection systems such as these to better prevent needlestick injuries across the entire healthcare ecosystem.
The World Health Organization estimates that of the 35 million healthcare workers around the world, two million people suffer accidental needlestick injuries each year.
Safety injection devices, which include safety syringes and safety needles, are designed to enhance safety of the drug administration process and eliminate needlestick injuries - a major cause of blood-borne infections.
Approximately 80 percent of needlestick injuries can be prevented, according to ISIPS Executive Director Ron Stoker.
LESS than half the healthcare workers in Delhi's hospitals know how to treat the needlestick injuries they sustain while treating patients.
Research published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons finds hospital rates of needlestick injuries fell 31.
nurses say needlestick injuries and blood borne infections remain major concerns, and 55 percent believe their workplace safety climate negatively impacts their own personal safety.
ANA is conducting a survey entitled 2008 Study of Nurses' Views on Workplace Safety and Needlestick Injuries to evaluate the registered nurses beliefs, opinions and views related to the use of safety syringes in the prevention of needlestick injuries and related workplace safety.
the annual cost of testing and treating needlestick injuries in Ontario's health care is $64 million;
However, the CTB-1 needle moves through the tissue very smoothly, and there is almost no perceptible difference between the CTB-1 and the conventional CT-1 needle--except that with the CTB-1, needlestick injuries to the obstetrician simply do not occur.
HBV, HCV, and HIV are the pathogens most often transmitted in documented cases of occupational infection following needlestick injuries in industrialized countries.