necropsy


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autopsy

 [aw´top-se]
examination of a body after death to determine the cause of death; it may be ordered by a coroner or medical examiner when the cause of death is unknown or the death has taken place under suspicious circumstances. Autopsies are also valuable sources of medical knowledge. Unless it is demanded by public authorities, an autopsy cannot be performed without permission of the next of kin of the deceased. Called also postmortem examination and necropsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē), Avoid the mispronunciation autop'sy.
1. An examination of the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. Synonym(s): necropsy
2. In the terminology of the ancient Greek school of empirics, the intentional reproduction of an effect, event, or circumstance that occurred in the course of a disease, and observation of its influence in ameliorating or aggravating the patient's symptoms.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

/nec·rop·sy/ (nek´rop-se) examination of a body after death; autopsy.

necropsy

(nĕk′rŏp′sē)
n. pl. necrop·sies

nec′rop′sy v.

necropsy, necroscopy

See autopsy.

autopsy

A postmortem examination of a body, which helps determine cause of death and identify any diseases that had not been detected while the patient was alive, or which confirms the presence of conditions diagnosed before the patient died.

Autopsy types 
• Biopsy only—A minimalist postmortem examination in which the prosector examines the organs, but only samples small fragments (biopsies) for histologic examination. 
• Chest only—An autopsy in which only the lungs and heart are examined; findings in a chest only autopsy are used to ID an occluding thrombus in the coronary arteries, massive patientE, or evaluate a person for compensation under the Black Lung Compensation act of 1969.
• Complete—An autopsy in which the thoracic, abdominal and cranial cavities are examined. 
• Head only—An autopsy in which the pathology of interest is presumed to reside entirely in the cranial cavity. 
• No head—An autopsy examining the chest and abdominal cavity without cranial cavity.

Infections (potentially fatal) that may pass to prosectors
Blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, diphtheria, erysipeloid, HBV (30% of seroconversion with infected blood exposure), HCV (up to 10% risk), HIV (0.3% risk), lymphocytic choriomeningitis, rabies, streptococci, TB (exposures as brief as 10 minutes have resulted in transmission; 10% of Finnish pathologists in active PM practice have occupational TB; autopsy-transmitted outbreaks of TB have occurred in NY, LA, Chicago and Arkansas), tularaemia, viral haemorrhagic fevers (Marburg, Ebola, Lassa), yellow fever. Two cases of possible transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to histology technicians (not autopsy prosectors) have been reported.

necropsy

Postmortem examination. See Autopsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē)
An examination of a corpse and the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. (Colloquially called postmortem or post.)
Synonym(s): necropsy.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

An autopsy, or postmortem examination, of a body.

necropsy

examination of a body after death. See also autopsy.
References in periodicals archive ?
1: Number of total avian and Backyard Flock submissions for necropsy examinations, 2007-2012.
Four persons participated in the necropsy of a harbor porpoise that was found subsequently to be infected with a Brucella species.
Like a human autopsy, a dolphin necropsy starts with an inch-by-inch inspection of the body under bright lights.
Consequently, some pertinent information is lacking, and/or difficult to interpret from the available necropsy reports.
Leptospiral antigen detection in postmortem samples is important for confirming the diagnosis (9) but is limited by tissue deterioration if there is a prolonged period between death and necropsy.
The necropsy found that the whale was alive when it was hit by the ship and died instantly.
In contrast, in the case cited above of the pathologist performing the necropsy, the injury was caused when the pathologist tightly closed his hand around the vena cava at the location containing the filter device.
There were 26 (7%) terrapins that had stool samples that were negative for parasitic ova and also had no visible gastrointestinal parasites at necropsy.
Specimens were sent to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) in College Station, Texas for complete necropsy.
Tissues were removed at necropsy, processed in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin using standard methods (2).
Necropsy Support: Not Just How To, But How To Safely" Lawrence Faucette HT/ACSP, Katherine Shea HTL/ACSP, and Marina Rahman HT/ASCP discuss and demonstrate murine necropsy techniques.
Following its death, a necropsy revealed a generalized granulomatous condition that involved the small intestines, lungs, liver, spleen, and medullary cavities of the long bones, with intracellular acid-fast bacilli identified as M genavense.