necropsy

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Related to necropsies: autopsist, autopsied

autopsy

 [aw´top-se]
examination of a body after death to determine the cause of death; it may be ordered by a coroner or medical examiner when the cause of death is unknown or the death has taken place under suspicious circumstances. Autopsies are also valuable sources of medical knowledge. Unless it is demanded by public authorities, an autopsy cannot be performed without permission of the next of kin of the deceased. Called also postmortem examination and necropsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē), Avoid the mispronunciation autop'sy.
1. An examination of the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. Synonym(s): necropsy
2. In the terminology of the ancient Greek school of empirics, the intentional reproduction of an effect, event, or circumstance that occurred in the course of a disease, and observation of its influence in ameliorating or aggravating the patient's symptoms.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

/nec·rop·sy/ (nek´rop-se) examination of a body after death; autopsy.

necropsy

(nĕk′rŏp′sē)
n. pl. necrop·sies

nec′rop′sy v.

necropsy, necroscopy

See autopsy.

autopsy

A postmortem examination of a body, which helps determine cause of death and identify any diseases that had not been detected while the patient was alive, or which confirms the presence of conditions diagnosed before the patient died.

Autopsy types 
• Biopsy only—A minimalist postmortem examination in which the prosector examines the organs, but only samples small fragments (biopsies) for histologic examination. 
• Chest only—An autopsy in which only the lungs and heart are examined; findings in a chest only autopsy are used to ID an occluding thrombus in the coronary arteries, massive patientE, or evaluate a person for compensation under the Black Lung Compensation act of 1969.
• Complete—An autopsy in which the thoracic, abdominal and cranial cavities are examined. 
• Head only—An autopsy in which the pathology of interest is presumed to reside entirely in the cranial cavity. 
• No head—An autopsy examining the chest and abdominal cavity without cranial cavity.

Infections (potentially fatal) that may pass to prosectors
Blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, diphtheria, erysipeloid, HBV (30% of seroconversion with infected blood exposure), HCV (up to 10% risk), HIV (0.3% risk), lymphocytic choriomeningitis, rabies, streptococci, TB (exposures as brief as 10 minutes have resulted in transmission; 10% of Finnish pathologists in active PM practice have occupational TB; autopsy-transmitted outbreaks of TB have occurred in NY, LA, Chicago and Arkansas), tularaemia, viral haemorrhagic fevers (Marburg, Ebola, Lassa), yellow fever. Two cases of possible transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to histology technicians (not autopsy prosectors) have been reported.

necropsy

Postmortem examination. See Autopsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē)
An examination of a corpse and the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. (Colloquially called postmortem or post.)
Synonym(s): necropsy.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

An autopsy, or postmortem examination, of a body.

necropsy

examination of a body after death. See also autopsy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eighteen pathology educators discussed the difficulties that they have faced in using autopsies in preclinical teaching, 12 coming from those programs that did not allow students to observe necropsies.
Seven states, including California, conduct full necropsies on horses.
Of the 101 fatal cases, necropsies were performed for 42.
To find out, scientists have performed necropsies, or examinations of animal carcasses, on the dead sea otters.
Necropsies on turtles caught by longline fisheries may provide additional objective data on the causes of mortality and the health of pelagic turtles.
By choosing physical examination, blood parasites, intestinal parasites, necropsies, and enteric cultures the authors felt that the more common terrapin diseases might be identified.
As a student at Guy's Hospital during the late 40s, I regularly attended necropsies and was required to present clinical details of patients whom I had clerked during life.
Six of the dead whales were sent to specialists for necropsies to determine the cause of death.
After two years, a pathologist necropsies the animals and diagnoses tumors at various sites.
He logged more than 100 necropsies, some taking 15 minutes and others taking hours.
NasdaqGM:RPRX) today released initial findings from evaluation of gross necropsies conducted upon completion of the in-life portion of a two-year study conducted to satisfy the balance of the FDA mandated two-species trials to demonstrate the lack of carcinogenic potential for new chemical entities.