necrophilic


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necrophilic

 [nek″ro-fil´ik]
1. pertaining to necrophilia.
2. showing a preference for dead tissue; said of certain microorganisms.

necrophilic

/nec·ro·phil·ic/ (-fil´ik)
1. pertaining to necrophilia.
2. showing preference for dead tissue, as necrophilic bacteria.

necrophilic

adjective Referring to necrophilia, see there.

necrophilic

(nĕk″rō-fĭl′ĭk) [″ + philein, to love]
1. Pert. to necrophilia.
2. Pert. to bacteria that thrive best in dead tissue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Though this necrophilic aesthetic permeates the entire novel, the explicit act itself occurs in the "episodio tragico" of Umbelino and Pantea, which the prince relates to Claudio after their visit to Violante's beloved fountain in the palace's garden.
In other words, the reification of Cortijo's dead effigy epitomizes a necrophilic perversion, which by way of its perversity should make the reader question the reliability and authority of the author-cumnarrator.
61) Within the Gothic genre, Poe had pioneered this method in his "Berenice" (1835), a brutally graphic tale of dental necrophilic fetishism.
Our notion of "civilization" is part of a dream state that keeps us unconscious of and complacent within our necrophilic desires.
The sexed-up, necrophilic dalliances of white (musical) masters and the (always) black, (most often) men that they admire and desire, consume and cannibalize continue to hold center stage in the critical imaginaries of performance studies and rock music histories alike.
Deep human despair perverts our sincerest hope for justice and righteousness, transforming it into a necrophilic justification for global annihilation.
Among their perspectives are necrophilic tendencies in Petrarch, Albrecht Durer's view of Orpheus after Eurydice, and Ben Jonson's epitaph for his first son.
There's nothing necrophilic about Elvis' sudden urge to kiss Anabelle--he's simply smitten, and acts on impulse--and, despite mood enhancement by conveniently bad weather, maybe nothing really supernatural about her instant revival.
building up in Anglican writing in Ireland: the horrific imagery of Sir John Temple, the narrative convolution of Molyneux and King, the vampirie, cannibalistic and zombified characters of Jonathan Swift, the transcendent sublime of Edmund Burke, the ritualized functions of commemorative ceremonies, the necrophilic neurosis of Graveyard Poetry, the ghosting of the past in Antiquarian research, and the childhood orientation of antiquarianism.
63) The late Grace Jantzen's magisterial Foundations of Violence also draws attention to what she calls the necrophilic habitus of modernity that, unchecked, will continue to bring about violence, death, and destruction.
Influenced by Walter Benjamin's theories of Tragodie and Trauerspiel, Zimmerman offers a compelling account of these plays' melodramatic excesses--particularly their characters' necrophilic obsessions--in relation to idolatrous tyranny; even more important, she explains the plays' seeming ideological inconsistency (their simultaneous iconoclasm and spiritual investment in the corpses of dead women) as the performative effect of early modern theatrical display, particularly but not restricted to the cross-dressing of boy actors.
What starts as a medieval tale in the style of Boccaccio soon turns into a narrative about necrophilic desire with a rather disturbing ending.