necrophagous


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Related to necrophagous: blowfly

necrophagous

 [nĕ-krof´ah-gus]
feeding upon dead flesh.

ne·croph·a·gous

(nĕ-krof'ă-gŭs),
1. Living on carrion.
2. Synonym(s): necrophilous
[necro- + G. phagō, to eat]

necrophagous

(nə-krŏf′ə-gəs, nĕ-)
adj.
Feeding on carrion or corpses: necrophagous organisms.

ne·croph·a·gous

(nĕ-krof'ă-gŭs)
1. Living on carrion.
2. Synonym(s): necrophilous.
[necro- + G. phagō, to eat]

necrophagous

  1. descriptive of an organism that feeds on dead animals or carrion. (The carrion crow is necrophagous.)
  2. descriptive of an organism that feeds on what is initially another living organism (or tissue) which is killed as a result of being fed on. The organism then continues to feed and obtain nutrient from the dead tissue. The term is usually applied to a microorganism feeding on a plant or plant material.

necrophagous

feeding upon dead flesh.
References in periodicals archive ?
More individuals were collected after the second day post-death, although in the Bloated and Active decay stage the relative proportion of necrophagous species was higher than at the other phases.
Some of these species considered necrophagous (Skidmore 1985) were captured in sunny microhabitats, while the remaining ones were associated with shaded microhabitats, trends also observed in other works (Mendes and Linhares 1993; Figueroa-Roa and Linhares 2004; Patitucci et al.
She found blowfly eggs on the animals' lips and eyes within 30 minutes after she shot the animals -- confirming that the necrophagous clock starts ticking soon after death, and providing a reliable starting point which investigators can calculate the PMI.
This study aims to create database information on necrophagous flies in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and it is important to the progress of forensic entomolgy in the country.
Notes on necrophagous flies (Diptera: Caliptrate) associated to fish carrion in Colombian Amazon.
Seasonal necrophagous insect community assembly during vertebrate carrion decomposition.
Objective: Forensic entomology is today an increasingly robust science which has its main application in the estimation of the minimum postmortem interval based on the age of necrophagous insects (mainly blowflies) collected from cadavers.
Few species are effectively necrophagous, while most of them are predatory, but both categories can provide useful information from the forensic point of view, especially concerning to the estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI) (Catts and Goff, 1992; Santos et al.
Indeed, Harker and the Count are bound by the same necrophagous impulse, that is, they both 'eat death'; one a carnivore who eats passively slaughtered nonhumans and the other a cannibal who eats humans he kills (or renders undead) himself.
Notes on necrophagous flies (Diptera: Calyptratae) associated to fish carrion in Colombian Amazon.
2005), according to the following categories: Insectivorous --feeding mainly on arthropods; Carnivorous--feeding mainly based on vertebrates; Frugivorous feeding mainly on fruits; Nectarivorous - feeding mainly on nectar; Necrophagous - feeding on dead animals; Omnivorous - feeding on fruits, arthropods and small vertebrates; Granivorous - feeding mainly on seeds; Piscivorous - feeding on fishes.
These non-colonizing insects include predators and parasites of necrophagous species, such as beetles in the families Silphidae, Staphylinidae, and Histeridae, are useful in succession-based PMI estimations (Anderson 2000), and most of the beetles that are collected during succession studies fall into this category.