necrolysis


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necrolysis

 [nĕ-krol´ĭ-sis]
separation or exfoliation of necrotic tissue.
toxic epidermal necrolysis an exfoliative skin disease in which erythema spreads rapidly over the body, followed by blisters much like those seen in a second degree burn. It may be caused by drug reactions, infections (viral, bacterial, or fungal), neoplastic disease, graft-versus-host reaction, and chemical exposure.

ne·crol·y·sis

(nĕ-krol'i-sis),
Necrosis and loosening of tissue.
[necro- + G. lysis, loosening]

necrolysis

/ne·crol·y·sis/ (nĕ-krol´ĭ-sis) separation or exfoliation of necrotic tissue.
toxic epidermal necrolysis  a severe cutaneous reaction, primarily to drugs, but also due to other causes such as infections or neoplastic disease, characterized by bulla formation, subepidermal separation, and widespread loss of skin, leaving raw denuded areas.

necrolysis

[nekrol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, nekros + lysis, loosening
disintegration or exfoliation of dead tissue. Compare necrosis. necrolytic, adj.

ne·crol·y·sis

(nĕ-krol'i-sis)
Necrosis and loosening of tissue.
[necro- + G. lysis, loosening]

necrolysis

separation or exfoliation of necrotic tissue.

toxic epidermal necrolysis
an acute exfoliative disease of skin and mucous membranes in dogs, cats and monkeys. Characterized by full thickness epidermal necrosis and accompanied by erythema, vesicles, bullae and ulcers, and systemic signs of fever, anorexia and lethargy. It is associated with concurrent infections or neoplasia, and drug reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in sub-Saharan Africa: A multicentric study in four countries.
Teraki Y, Murota H, Izaki S: Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to zonisamide associated with reactivation of human herpesvirus 6.
Outbreak of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with mebendazole and metronidazole use among Filipino laborers in Taiwan.
1,6,10,12) These drugs are administered with the belief that they halt the process of epidermal necrolysis.
Classification of hypersensitivity reactions (Gell and Coombs) Type Mechanism Clinical findings I Anaphylactic (IgE Acute anaphylaxis mediated) Uritcaria II Complement mediated Hemolytic anemia, cytolisis (IgG/IgM) thrombocytopenia III Immune complex Serum sickness Drug mediated fever Some skin eruptions and vasculits IV Delayed or cellular Contact dermatitis hypersensitivity "Morbilliform" eruptions Intestitial nephritis SJS/TEN Hepatitis SJS: Stevens-Johnson syndrome TEN: Toxic epidermal necrolysis Table 3.
Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome: does early withdrawal of causative drugs decrease the risk of death?
Hypersensitivity reactions to carbamazepine include maculopapular exanthema, the hypersensitivity syndrome, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
An update on Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in children.
It said reports of a medical wrongdoing were "untrue and misinformed" because Manal was suffering from Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, a rare condition that affected the skin and mucous membranes.
Eve had the most severe form of the condition, called Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.
Toxic epidermal necrolysis, also called Lyell syndrome, is one of the most severe drug eruptions.
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: A systemic skin disease, similar to epidermal necrolysis, (death) with fevers and lesions of the oral, conjunctival {eye} and vaginal mucous membranes.