determinism

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Related to necessitarianism: contingent

determinism

 [de-ter´mĭ-nizm]
the theory that all phenomena are the result of antecedent conditions, nothing occurs by chance, and there is no free will.

de·ter·mi·nism

(dē-ter'mi-nizm),
The proposition that all behavior is caused exclusively by genetic and environmental influences with no random components, and independent of free will.
[L. determino, to limit, fr. terminus, boundary + -ism]

determinism

/de·ter·min·ism/ (de-ter´mĭn-izm) the theory that all phenomena are the result of antecedent conditions, nothing occurs by chance, and there is no free will.

de·ter·mi·nism

(dē-tĕr'mi-nizm)
The proposition that all behavior is caused exclusively by genetic and environmental influences with no random components, and independent of free will.
[L. determino, to limit, fr. terminus, boundary + -ism]

determinism,

n the notion that events may be predicted and anticipated by knowing the initial conditions and scientific law.

determinism

the theory that all phenomena are the result of antecedent conditions and that nothing occurs by chance.

Patient discussion about determinism

Q. Is it effective to determine the problem? How is the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy done and is it effective to determine the problem?

A. actually it will come with three common symptoms such as : positive pregnancy, abdominal pain or cramp, and bleeding. if you're happened to feel one of those symptoms, i'll suggest you to go see your ob-gyn specialist, then the doctor will do the physical examination on you, and will confirm the diagnosis with ultrasound.

Q. In which month of pregnancy it's possible to determine gender of the fetus?

A. following marin's question - is there a difference when it comes to twins?

Q. how do i determine what is the right weight i need to be? i know there is a way to calculate it, an equation , what are the parameters in it ?

A. I don't mean to burst any bubbles, but BMI is definitely not a good way to determine what weight you should be. If you considered that a body builder or a professional athlete is considered obese under BMI standards then you would know what I mean. Here is an article about it I found on Medical News Today: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/49991.php

More discussions about determinism
References in periodicals archive ?
Implicit in the passage may be the suggestion that the PSR entails necessitarianism, the view that all existence is necessary existence.
There is still more to say, however, with respect to Leibniz's alleged necessitarianism.
Warren's emphasis on the motifs of Original Sin, moral agency, and guilt, coming in tandem with an understanding of Necessitarianism as a form of strict determinism, led him to reject the early Necessitarian reading of Coleridge's poem offered by Solomon Gingerich in Essays in the Romantic Poets (New York: Macmillan, (924) 30-31.
109) Broadly defined, truthmaker necessitarianism is the view according to which the very existence of a truthmaker is enough to necessitate that truth which it makes true.
The counterintuitive implications of law necessitarianism pose a far more serious threat than its proponents recognize.
For example, Armstrong's instantiation condition on universals entails that according to strong necessitarianism every property is instantiated in all possible worlds.
If the typical presupposition that necessitarianism is false is made explicit in counterlegal utterances, we obtain sentences such as, "If it turns out that the laws of nature are contingent, then if the laws had been otherwise, then such and such would have been the case," which are nonvacuous and very often true.
Spinoza's Proof of Necessitarianism, OLLI KOISTINEN
Accepting the principle that a law can only hold in a world if it has some ontological grounding in that world, the author argues that necessitarianism is committed to the claim that any law holding in the actual world is grounded in every possible world, and that any law holding in any possible world is grounded in the actual world.
Edwin Curley and Gregory Walski suggest that Spinoza has some room for contingency in regard to finite modes, arguing among other things that to attribute a strict necessitarianism to Spinoza is an implausible view "that should not be attributed to great, dead philosophers without pretty strong textual evidence" (p.
Even though this reading is not sanctioned by the usual formulations of necessitarianism, (86) I see no reason not to call one a necessitarian who believes that everything in the world is absolutely necessary, even if he accepts nonexistent particulars.