naturalize

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Related to naturalizes: naturalised, denaturalization

naturalize

(năch′ər-ə-līz′, năch′rə-)
v. natural·ized, natural·izing, natural·izes
v.tr.
To introduce and establish (a species) in an environment to which it is not native: European birds that became naturalized in North America.
v.intr.
To become naturalized or acclimated.

nat′u·ral·iz′a·ble adj.
nat′u·ral·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Citizenship is permanent and relieves one of the continuous residency requirements LPRs must meet to maintain their legal status (14) as well as to preserve their option to naturalize (see "Continuous Residence" below).
The United States benefits from having eligible foreign-born persons naturalize and acquire U.
In addition to greater civic participation and commitment, empirical research offers evidence of economic benefits to the foreign born who naturalize, including a number of studies showing significant wage gains after controlling for personal characteristics such as education and work experience.
Since August 2009, the Naturalization at Basic Training Program has offered enlistees the option to naturalize upon graduation from basic training.
76) Within the past two decades, and for a variety of reasons, a number of countries such as Mexico, Columbia, and Brazil have facilitated dual citizenship by passing laws permitting their expatriates the right to naturalize in other countries without losing citizenship from their countries of origin.
The number of persons petitioning to naturalize has increased over the past two decades, from just over 200,000 in FY1991 to just under 900,000 in FY2012 (Figure 1 and Appendix A).
8 million LPRs between 1986 and 1989 who then became eligible to naturalize in the mid-1990s.
Demographically, the number of legal permanent residents admitted to the United States or adjusting status (99) averaged roughly 418,000 each year between 1966-1980; 654,000 between 1981-1995; and 957,000 between 1996-2010, substantially enlarging the pool of people eligible to naturalize.
Other research suggests that the social context of state-level immigrant receptivity plays a more important role in the decision to naturalize than state-level welfare benefit levels.