natality


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natality

 [na-tal´ĭ-te]
the birth rate.

na·tal·i·ty

(nā-tal'i-tē),
The birth rate; the ratio of births to the general population.
[see natal (1)]

natality

(nā-tăl′ĭ-tē, nə-)
n. pl. natali·ties

na·tal·i·ty

(nā-tal'i-tē)
The birth rate; the ratio of births to the general population.
See: natal (1)

natality

the birth rate.

Patient discussion about natality

Q. Can autism occur in more than one child? We’re a couple in our early thirties, and have a 8 years old son that was diagnosed with autism. It’s not easy to rear him, but now we feel we are ready for another child. However, we are very worried – our first son was born healthy, and only couple of years later he was diagnosed with autism. We love him very much, but we feel another child with autism will be just beyond our energies. What are the chances we will have another child with autism? Is there any way to diagnose the baby during pregnancy?

A. YES

More discussions about natality
References in periodicals archive ?
section][section]) Natality data from New York City are reported separately and are not included in New York state estimates.
The results of the research indicate that the female population is of the opinion that additional natality policy measures could have a stimulating effect on the birth of more children.
The attention to vulnerability, forgiveness, the community and natality take us to the thought of another feminist philosopher, Christine Battersby, who - in her book Phenomenal Woman (1998)--has theorized the radical traits of the female body as an ontology of newness and natality.
Studies of the population dynamics of herbaceous species in the semiarid areas of Brazil (Caatinga) have also indicated that variation in establishment conditions for seedlings may promote natality in some populations (Andrade et al.
20) We will return to this phenomenon when analyzing the natality data below.
Generalisation of this study can be challenged, yet arguably transferability to other regions is possible given the universal experience of natality.
Natality is expressed quantitatively through a gross ratio of natality which represents the number of the alive new born for 1,000 inhabitants during a calendar year.
It is evident from the preceding data and discussion that gender inequalities in mortality and natality are comparatively low among Muslims, manifested through more females in their population than in the population of other communities.
As Anne O'Byrne points out, natality is a condition of mortal existence that discloses our finitude and contingency "in the recognition that there was once a time when we were not, that we owe our existence to others, and that those others are nevertheless not the ground of our being" (7).
The miracle that saves the world, the realm of human affairs, from its normal, "natural" ruin is ultimately the fact of natality, in which the faculty of action is ontologically rooted.
And again in this passage, as related to ontological origin of the human's power and potential, through "learning," to usher in, and beyond, embody, "new beginnings": "The miracle that saves the world, the realm of human affairs, from its normal, "natural" ruin is ultimately the fact of natality, in which the faculty of action is ontologically rooted.
There is still room to influence the increase of natality.