natality


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natality

 [na-tal´ĭ-te]
the birth rate.

na·tal·i·ty

(nā-tal'i-tē),
The birth rate; the ratio of births to the general population.
[see natal (1)]

natality

(nā-tăl′ĭ-tē, nə-)
n. pl. natali·ties

na·tal·i·ty

(nā-tal'i-tē)
The birth rate; the ratio of births to the general population.
See: natal (1)

natality

the birth rate.

Patient discussion about natality

Q. Can autism occur in more than one child? We’re a couple in our early thirties, and have a 8 years old son that was diagnosed with autism. It’s not easy to rear him, but now we feel we are ready for another child. However, we are very worried – our first son was born healthy, and only couple of years later he was diagnosed with autism. We love him very much, but we feel another child with autism will be just beyond our energies. What are the chances we will have another child with autism? Is there any way to diagnose the baby during pregnancy?

A. YES

More discussions about natality
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Natality data are a national dataset on births in the United States and include all states that enacted mandates in the 1990s, we also utilize a second dataset, the PRAMS.
Lower birth rate and greater parental attention to individual children helped advance the lower death rate--which in turn encouraged further reductions in natality.
PRAMS data are augmented with selected variables from the Natality data set of the National Center for Health Statistics for the corresponding birth.
Yet recently one can find more feminist voices which construct a feminist maternal theology, (46) a feminist maternal peace politics (47) and a feminist philosophy of natality.
Filiative belonging, which may as an idea bear a resemblance to Hannah Arendt's idea of natality, (21) includes not just our blood ties, however, but also succumbing to the traditional authority of family bonds and genealogical structures.
The image of natality (Mother Nature giving birth to the world's many beings) supplanted an image of self-generation and self-renewal.
The proposed legislation concerned the rights and obligations of citizens, public transportation and a Quebec natality policy.
In 1989 the National Center for Health Statistics changed how race was recorded for natality and fetal death.
Similarly, seasonality can alter rates of compensatory mortality and natality, and thus change population density of prey (Boyce et al.
census data for counties under surveillance and natality data on live births are the sources of denominators for incidence calculations; the most recent year's population data available with age and race information at the county level are used for rate calculations.
National Center for Health Statistics, "Advance Report of Final Natality Statistics, 1990," Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 41 (Suppl.