nasoduodenal tube

nasoduodenal tube

(nā″zō-dū-ă-dē′năl, -doo) (nā″zō-dū-ŏd′ĕ-năl, -doo)
A flexible tube of silicone or a similar synthetic material, inserted through the nose into the duodenum for short-term enteral feeding. The small weight on the distal end of the tube moves the tube into place through the stomach into the duodenum. Aspiration is less likely than with a nasogastric tube.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Right now, there are a number of methods (colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy, enema, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, nasogastric or nasoduodenal tube, and capsules), and no consensus on which is the best.
A mean of 141 g of feces was infused through a nasoduodenal tube, and patients were monitored for 2 hours.
About a decade ago, physicians there, without seeking her parents' permission, inserted a nasoduodenal tube because she was having difficulty swallowing and aspirated food taken by mouth.
In the fall of 1989 the staff wanted to replace Doe's nasoduodenal tube with a surgically implanted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube.
In fecal transplantation, donor stool is delivered from below through a colonoscope or retention enema, or from above through a nasogastric or nasoduodenal tube, to replace colonic flora wiped out by antibiotics, reestablishing the patient's resistance to colonization by C.
A randomized trial is currently underway in the Netherlands pitting vancomycin therapy against nasoduodenal tube fecal transplantation for recurrent C.
The studies involved 929 patients who had been randomized to intravenous fluids and nothing by mouth or to various routes of feeding, including oral, nasojejunal or nasoduodenal tubes, or jejunostomy during the first 24 hours after GI surgery.