nascent

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nascent

 [nas´ent, na´sent]
1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical combination, and hence more reactive because uncombined.

nas·cent

(nas'ent, nā'sent),
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nascent

/nas·cent/ (nas´ent) (na´sent)
1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical combination, and hence more reactive because uncombined.

nascent

[nas′ənt, nā′sənt]
Etymology: L, nasci, to be born
1 just born; beginning to exist; incipient.
2 (in chemistry) pertaining to any substance liberated during a chemical reaction that, because of its uncombined state, is more reactive.

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nascent (nas´ənt, nā´sənt),

adj literal meaning: recently born. Also, just released from chemical combination.

nascent

1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical reaction, and hence more reactive.

nascent DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversing with the friend need not violate one's conception of what is all-out best or nascently harmonize with it.
20 (1996) ("Why no one responded [to the originalists] that it was simply stupid to attempt to govern an imperial power by the understandings of appropriateness derived from a sleepy, largely agricultural, though nascently commercial colonial outpost is unclear to me.
The early American South, on the other hand, was nascently "Lockean" before Locke, presumably tending to separate family life from the civil society and the state, so keeping these latter spheres more exclusively male.
The Duke and Dauphin are liars who instruct Huck in an art at which his capacity for disguises indicates that he is already nascently adroit: Jack invites an ear-minded response, and Huck's pleasure is as much in his own as in Jack's acuteness; both parties are aware that truth exists through the slant.