intubation

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intubation

 [in″too-ba´shun]
the insertion of a tube, as into the larynx; see also cannulation and catheterization. The purpose of intubation varies with the location and type of tube inserted; generally it is done to allow drainage, to maintain an open airway, or to administer anesthetics or oxygen.

Intubation into the stomach or intestine is done to remove gastric or intestinal contents for the relief or prevention of distention, or to obtain a specimen for analysis. Another example of intubation is when a tube is inserted into the common bile duct to allow for drainage of bile from ducts draining the liver, done after surgery on the gallbladder or the common bile duct. Endotracheal intubation can be achieved by insertion of an endotracheal tube, sometimes containing a stylet, via the mouth or nose with the aid of a laryngoscope. It is done for the purpose of assuring patency of the upper airway. tracheostomy is a form of endotracheal intubation.
gastrointestinal intubation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion of a tube into the gastrointestinal tract.

in·tu·ba·tion

(in'tū-bā'shŭn),
Insertion of a tubular device into a canal, hollow organ, or cavity; specifically, passage of an orotracheal or nasotracheal tube for anesthesia or for control of pulmonary ventilation.
[L. in, in, + tuba, tube]

intubation

/in·tu·ba·tion/ (in″too-ba´shun) the insertion of a tube into a body canal or hollow organ, as into the trachea.
endotracheal intubation  insertion of a tube into the trachea for purposes of anesthesia, airway maintenance, aspiration of secretions, lung ventilation, or prevention of entrance of foreign material into the airway; the tube goes through the nose (nasotracheal i.) or mouth (orotracheal i.) .
nasal intubation  insertion of a tube into the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract through the nose.
oral intubation  insertion of a tube into the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract through the mouth.

intubation

Etymology: L, in, within, tubus, tube, atio, process
passage of a tube into a body aperture, specifically the insertion of a breathing tube through the mouth or nose into the trachea to ensure a patent airway for the delivery of anesthetic gases and oxygen or both. Blind intubation is the insertion of a breathing tube without the use of a laryngoscope. Kinds of intubation include endotracheal intubation and nasotracheal intubation.

intubation

The placement of a tube for respiratory support or gastric feeding. See Gastric intubation. Cf Extubation.

in·tu·ba·tion

(in'tū-bā'shŭn)
Insertion of a tubular device into a canal, hollow organ, or cavity; specifically, passage of an orotracheal or nasotracheal tube for anesthesia or for control of pulmonary ventilation.
[L. in, in, + tuba, tube]

intubation

(in?too-ba'shon, tu-)
Enlarge picture
OROTRACHEAL INTUBATION: endotracheal tube with bag-mask ventilation
The insertion of a tube into any hollow organ. Intubation of the trachea provides an open airway and thus is an essential step in advanced life support. It also permits the instillation of certain critical care drugs, such as lidocaine, epinephrine, and atropine, which the lungs can absorb directly when other forms of internal access are unavailable. In the patient with no evidence of head or cervical spine trauma, using a head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver to place the patient in a “sniffing” position facilitates intubation of the trachea. See: illustration

Intubation of other structures, such as the organs of the upper gastrointestinal tract, may permit enteral nutrition, the dilation of strictures, or the visualization of internal anatomy.

endotracheal intubation

The insertion of an endotracheal tube through the nose or mouth into the trachea to maintain the airway, to administer an anesthetic gas or oxygen, or to aspirate secretions.

CAUTION!

Endotracheal intubation can be hazardous to patients with injuries to, or instability of, the cervical vertebra. In trauma patients suspected of cervical fracture, or in patients (such as those with advanced rheumatoid arthritis) who may have an unstable cervical spine, it is safer to use nasotracheal, rather than orotracheal intubation to control the airway.

esophageal intubation

The improper placement of an endotracheal tube, intended to provide a conduit for air to and from the lungs, into the esophagus. It is a common and potentially life-threatening occurrence during anesthesia and critical illnesses.

Patient care

Health care practitioners have several means at their disposal to try to recognize esophageal intubation. These include direct observation of the endotracheal tube, as it passes through the vocal cords, or capnography.

CAUTION!

Failure to recognize esophageal intubation can result in inadequate oxygenation of the patient.

nasogastric intubation

The insertion of a Levine or other gastrointestinal tube through the nose into the stomach.
See: gastric lavage; nasogastric tube

nasotracheal intubation

The insertion of an endotracheal tube through the nose and into the trachea. Unlike orotracheal intubation, the tube is passed “blindly” without using a laryngoscope to visualize the glottic opening. Because this technique may be used without hyperextension of the neck, it is used in patients suspected of having cervical spinal trauma or known to have oral lesions. Endotracheal tubes inserted nasally need to be of smaller diameter than those inserted orally.

CAUTION!

Endotracheal tubes frequently irritate the nasopharynx, and can cause both bleeding (on insertion), and sinusitis.
See: endotracheal intubation

rapid sequence intubation

Abbreviation: RSI
An airway control technique that uses powerful sedatives and paralytic drugs to quickly gain control of the airway, e.g., in life-threatening emergencies.

stomach intubation

Passage of a tube into the stomach to obtain gastric contents for examination, for prophylaxis and treatment of ileus, to remove ingested poisons, or for feeding.

intubation

The passage of any tube, such as a CATHETER or windpipe (tracheal) AIRWAY into any organ or tubular structure in the body. Intubation may be done to keep a passageway, such as the LARYNX, open, to withdraw a specimen for analysis, or to administer a drug.

Intubation

The insertion of a tube into the patient's airway to protect the airway from collapsing. Intubation is sometimes done as an emergency procedure for patients with epiglottitis.

intubation (inˈ·t·bāˑ·shn),

n the insertion of a cannula or a tube into a hollow organ, such as intestines or trachea, to maintain an opening or passageway.

in·tu·ba·tion

(in'tū-bā'shŭn)
Insertion of a tubular device into a canal, hollow organ, or cavity.
[L. in, in, + tuba, tube]

intubation (in´toobā´shən),

n the insertion of a tube; especially the introduction of a tube into the larynx through the glottis for the introduction of an anesthetic gas or oxygen.

intubation

the insertion of a tube, as into the larynx. The purpose of intubation varies with the location and type of tube inserted; generally the procedure is done to allow for drainage, to maintain an open airway, or for the administration of anesthetics or oxygen.
Intubation into the stomach or intestine is done to remove gastric or intestinal contents for the relief or prevention of distention, or to obtain a specimen for analysis, or to introduce drugs, medication, food or nutrients. A rubber or plastic nasogastric tube is introduced through the mouth or nose and into the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some degree of nasal trauma is inevitable, even during "uneventful" nasal intubations.
Blind nasal intubation is not routinely taught in our institution, but individual physicians proficient with the method preferred it in spontaneously breathing patients.
Wisconsin and Blind nasal intubation Seward blades-- (listening/feeling)-- failed.
The concluding comment "However, the technique of ventilating a patient through a partially inserted tracheal tube by occluding the contra-lateral nostril and closing the mouth may be useful while performing a nasal intubation using a conventional laryngoscopic technique" seems to have missed the point of the article.
Murphy P A fibre-optic endoscope used for nasal intubation.
Bloodless turbinectomy following blind nasal intubation.
The use of an oral artificial airway instead of the nasal type is recommended because nasal intubations increases the risk of developing nosocomial sinusitis thus will further increasing the development of VAP (Pruitt & Jacobs, 2006).