narcosis


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Related to narcosis: carbon dioxide narcosis

narcosis

 [nahr-ko´sis]
a reversible state of central nervous system depression induced by a drug.
basal narcosis narcosis with complete unconsciousness, amnesia, and analgesia.
carbon dioxide narcosis respiratory acidosis.
nitrogen narcosis a state resembling drunkenness, with euphoria and disorientation, seen in divers below about 30 meters (100 feet) who are breathing compressed air, because of the high nitrogen content of air; some of the nitrogen enters the bloodstream and acts as a narcotic.

nar·co·sis

(nar-kō'sis),
General and nonspecific reversible depression of neuronal excitability, produced by various physical and chemical agents, usually resulting in stupor rather than in anesthesia (with which narcosis was formerly synonymous).
[G. a benumbing]

narcosis

/nar·co·sis/ (nahr-ko´sis) reversible depression of the central nervous system produced by drugs, marked by stupor or insensibility.

narcosis

(när-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. narco·ses (-sēz)
A condition of deep stupor or unconsciousness produced by a drug or other chemical substance.

narcosis

[närkō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, narkosis, numbness
a state of insensibility or stupor caused by opioid drugs. See also narcotic.

narcosis

Psychiatry Drug-induced stupor of varying depth. See Nitrogen narcosis.

nar·co·sis

(nahr-kō'sis)
General and nonspecific reversible depression of neuronal excitability, produced by a number of physical and chemical agents, usually resulting in stupor rather than in anesthesia (with which narcosis was once synonymous).
[G. narkōtikos, a benumbing]

narcosis

A state of unconsciousness that may range from sleep to deep, irreversible coma. In most cases narcosis is caused by a drug.

nar·co·sis

(nahr-kō'sis)
General and nonspecific reversible depression of neuronal excitability, produced by physical and chemical agents, usually resulting in stupor rather than in anesthesia.
[G. narkōtikos, a benumbing]

narcosis (närkō´sis),

n drug-induced unconsciousness.

narcosis

a reversible state of central nervous system depression induced by a drug.

basal narcosis, basis narcosis
narcosis with complete unconsciousness, amnesia and analgesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
But as the surgical abortion was combined with narcosis, this kind of abortion could be regarded as the best way of not having to know what really happens during the abortion itself:
The Uptake of Thiopental by Body Tissues and Its Relation to the Duration of Narcosis 1 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS 16 (1960).
Full-day postoperative narcosis with high dose opiates was replaced by short track anaesthesia with extubation within 6 hours of surgery, a lower dose of opiates, and an increase in inhalation anaesthetics.
That is important, I want to suggest, because it discloses that the Canadian legal community is afflicted by a wide-ranging constitutional immaturity and insolence, which arises from and expresses a deep and deadening cultural narcosis among a great many judges and lawyers.
Neither spontaneous activity was reduced nor the duration of ether-induced narcosis was prolonged.
tibialis anterior (containing predominantly types IIA and IIB muscle fibers) (Delp and Duan, 1996) of each rat in both groups was evaluated by isolating the right limb muscle under narcosis (thiopental 10 mg/kg).
Carbon dioxide retention with resultant narcosis required intubation and mechanical ventilation assistance for the first 24 hours after surgery.
High-resolution HRV analysis usefulness was proved for definition of cardiovascular risk, narcosis monitoring and management of patients after intervention.
Make your fucking Hispanic pool-cleaner move the book while you keep your eyes absolutely still as if you were in some kind of academic catatonia or waking lifestyle narcosis, pausing once every minute or so to gargle your dark brown spawny pina colada.
Magaw wrote that, "Suggestion is a great aid in producing a comfortable narcosis and the subconscious or secondary self is particularly susceptible to suggestive influence.
Fatal dives are frequently put down to nitrogen narcosis, which can lead to unpredictable and dangerous behaviour in deep waters.