nanotechnology


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nanotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
technology at the level of atoms, molecules, and molecular fragments, including manipulating them and creating new structures.

nanotechnology

(nă″nō-tĕk-nŏl′ŏ-jē) [L. nanus, dwarf, + Gr. technē, art, + logos, word, reason]
The scientific study and engineering of chemical or biological objects measuring between 1 and 1000 nanometers. Objects this small are about the size of atoms or small molecules. “Wet” nanotechnology is the manipulation of organic or biological compounds in solution. “Dry” nanotechnology is the engineering of objects on silicon or carbon surfaces, such as those used in computing.

nanotechnology

The application of the science of manipulation at an atomic level. The practical applications of the ability to move single atoms so as to construct molecules, materials, structures and even functioning machines at an atomic level. Nanotechnology is currently at a germinal stage but is expected to have extensive applications in medicine. See also MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides this, the report covers the global R&D funding for the nanotechnology industry, including break-ups for corporate, public and venture capital funding along with their forecasts.
Nanotechnology Project Manager: These people will lead and manage nanotechnology industry projects, and will have an in-depth understanding of the procedures, equipment, and methodologies of nanotechnology.
R & D collaboration to include the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and its centers -- This emphasizes the importance of collaboration and cooperation among researchers from various disciplines and organizations, including universities, research institutes.
The first thing we have to do is know who is producing nanotechnology related products," he said.
According to Mihail Roco, senior advisor on nanotechnology to the National Science Foundation (NSF) and coordinator of the NNI, nanotechnology will have four generations, or phases of development.
In the early phases, nanotechnology will be limited to industries where it seems to have some relevance: computers, medicine, airplanes, automobiles.
Building on that, new interdisciplinary nanotechnology research centers authorized under the new act will be required to study the impacts of their work.
Nanotechnology excites both extravagant hopes and deep fears, sometimes in the same people.
Plans are afoot to bring out a Lancome nanotechnology foundation (for the skin, not an institute) next year.
Interest in nanotechnology is growing exponentially in the form of startup companies, university research centers, increased federal, state and local government spending, and corporate investments in the field.
Richard Smalley, a Nobel-prize-winning chemist there, has used nanotechnology to create molecules, called nanotubes, that are stronger than any object on earth yet still extremely flexible.
u US has the largest share of global investment in Nanotechnology.