nanosecond


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nanosecond

 (ns) [nan´o-sek″ond]
one billionth (10−9) of a second.

nanosecond (ns)

[nan′əsek′ənd]
Etymology: Gk, nanos, dwarf; L, secundus, second
one billionth (10-9) of a second.

nan·o·sec·ond

(nan'ō-sek-ŏnd)
One billionth of a second.

nanosecond

One billionth of a second.

nanosecond

one-thousand-millionth (10−9) second; abbreviated ns or nsec.
References in periodicals archive ?
There has been an insatiable drive by our customers from milliseconds to microseconds and now to nanoseconds," said Donal O'Sullivan, VP Product Management, Corvil.
As the demand for increased granularity and accuracy of network traffic timing grows, nanosecond timing is required.
Using this technology, Burstream ensures algorithms receive normalized order book data via dedicated PCIe (PCI Express(TM)) connections in less than 900 nanoseconds, even during volume bursts and message peaks.
Accordingly, any influence on the waveform quality resulting from connection of the probe is suppressed to the minimum, making it possible to further refine analysis from microseconds previously to the order of nanoseconds.
Until now, the highest performance available from a one-chip power supply with MOS outputs was 500 KHz, and capable of switching 10 amps in 50 nanoseconds with 18 watts power dissipation (SGS L4970).
Gordon, the first MD in the United States approved to treat humans with soft tissue injury and arthritis using nanosecond pulsed electromagnetic field technology, chaired the first symposium on free radical damage in sports injury presented at an annual meeting of The American College of Sports Medicine.
Gordon received expressions of interest from DOD program directors wishing to study his nanosecond technology further.
The combination of Intel systems and Dolphin software will deliver the lowest application latency available today, starting at 300 nanoseconds.
But triangulenium dyes produce light for an entire 100 nanoseconds.
The CJ1 features processor speeds ranging from 80 nanoseconds to as low as 20 nanoseconds per basic instruction, and up to 2,560 I/O points.
This step is interesting in view of the tautological method Kowanz has pursued over the last few years--for instance, in "Speed of Light sec/Im," 1993, neon tubes on which were printed a long sequence of numbers referring to the time in nanoseconds required by light to cover the distance from one end of the tube to the other.
He said that read times were between 25 and 100 nanoseconds.