stereotype

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stereotype

 [ster´e-o-tīp″]
an exaggerated, generalized, oversimplified belief or image, often concerning a group, an individual, or a form of behavior.

stereotype

[stir′ē·ətīp]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + typos, mark
a generalization about a form of behavior, an individual, or a group.

stereotype

Neurology Stereotypy, see there Vox populi A preconceived and oversimplified idea of the characteristics which make up a person. See Sexual stereotype, Skid row stereotype.

stereotype,

n a generalization about a form of behavior, an individual, or a group.
References in periodicals archive ?
The current findings are consistent with previous studies showing that gay-related name-calling is used as a response to the violation of gender norms (Franklin, 2000; Jewell & Morrison, 2010; McCann, et al.
And even if you refrain from name-calling yourself, keep in mind that laughing at it or in any other way tolerating it when it is done by others sends the same improper message to your children.
It varied from principal to principal as to how to handle name-calling and the use of racial slurs," Gallizzi said.
Shirley, who also has a 14-year-old son, Alan, added: "I've always told Terence to try to ignore the name-calling and just walk away.
The most recent figures show that in the school year ending in July there were 22 racist incidents involving violence and 57 incidents of racist name-calling - however that is a big drop on last year's total of 144.
Two of the thong-clad body-builder's pals are locked in a name-calling feud over who is closest to him.
41% mentioned threatening and name-calling as ways that they and people they knew responded to conflict.
It was a pandering, mudslinging, name-calling political statement," the Democrats stated.
It is time to think rationally and tune out the name-calling wacko nut cases.
After all the name-calling, in eighth grade I went to see an endocrinologist (a specialist in hormones, the chemicals that regulate the body.
The author's debut titles call attention to countless children who deal with name-calling and peer pressure every day.
You're not weird, and name-calling is not uncommon.