nalmefene


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nalmefene

 [nal´mĕ-fēn″]
an opioid antagonist, used as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of opioid overdose and postoperative opioid depression.

nalmefene

/nal·me·fene/ (nal´mĕ-fēn″) an opioid antagonist, used as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of opioid overdose and postoperative opioid depression.

nalmefene

(năl′mə-fēn′)
n.
A drug, C21H25NO3, used as an antagonist to narcotic drugs.

nalmefene

[nal′mĕfēn′]
an opioid antagonist, used as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of opioid overdose and postoperative opioid depression.

nalmefene, nalmetrene

a narcotic antagonist, similar to naloxone, used to temporarily control obsessive behavior such as crib-biting in horses and self-mutilation in dogs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nalmefene, an opioid receptor antagonist, received marketing approval across Europe for use specifically in a novel as-needed dosing regimen that is under the patient's control.
Nalmefene, also called Selincro, is suitable for anyone who regularly drinks high amounts of alcohol, which is defined by the World Health Organisation as 7.
Patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence will be given brief counselling by their GP but if they cannot substantially reduce their alcohol intake over a couple of weeks they can be prescribed nalmefene.
Nalmefene may be an option for patients who experience adverse side effects from naltrexone or who do not respond to that drug.
1 drug, the Nalmefene Hydrochloride Injection ("Nalmefene Hydrochloride"), received a new drug certificate (H20120078) and approval for production (2012S00818) from the State Food and Drug Administration.
The drug, nalmefene, is designed to take the buzz out of shopping.
In the following year, BioTie Therapies granted the license of oral nalmefene hydrochloride to Somaxon.
Another generic drug, Nalmefene Hydrochloride, is pending on-site inspection by the SFDA.
Although human studies have confirmed that naltrexone and another opiate antagonist, nalmefene, are both effective in preventing relapse in abstinent alcoholics (Schuckit 1996), the effects of opiate antagonists on stress-induced relapse have nor yet been investigated specifically in humans.
The decrease primarily reflects the completion of the Phase 3 clinical development program for SILENOR[TM] and the clinical trials of nalmefene for smoking cessation and the treatment of pathological gambling which were conducted during 2006.
If you want to give up the shopping habit, a drug available in the US, nalmefene, which works by blocking the brain's ability to enjoy pathological pleasure, could be the answer in the future.
The mu receptor antagonist nalmefene has been shown to increase abstinence in a preliminary placebo-controlled, double-blind study of 21 alcoholics (Mason et al.