naked

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naked

(nā′kĕd) [AS naced, nude]
Uncovered, exposed to view, nude, bare, devoid of clothing.

naked

(of a plant structure) without hairs or scales.
References in periodicals archive ?
6-magnitude star, which is within reach of the naked eye under a dark sky.
It's just emerged in the morning sky and it's now the time when the public can see it with the naked eye - now it's the public's turn.
c) The two-picoliter size ink drop along with the advanced MicroFine Droplet Technology and six-color inks deliver amazing quality and gradation with ink drops virtually undetectable to the naked eye.
A north up, correct view is what you see with the naked eye or binoculars from mid-northern latitudes when objects near the celestial equator or ecliptic are due south and highest in the sky.
Before 1609, when Galileo began using a brand new invention called the telescope, humankind's perception of the cosmos was limited to what could be seen with the naked eye.
Both kinds of mites are minuscule; the Verroa mite, however, is visible to the naked eye as a pinhead-sized red dot (not to be confused with spider mites, which are also red, that inhabit landscape ornamentals).
Unlike the accuracy of visual screening by the naked eye -- which has been found to fluctuate greatly over time - this automated detection system is proving to be both efficient and effective in determining if the bird has a systemic defect or if there are other quality problems, such as mishung birds, empty shackles or bruising," said Wayne Daley, who has led the development effort for GTRI.
Smyth later clarified that "the Praesepe, metaphorically rendered Bee-hive, is an aggregation of small stars which has long borne the name of a nebula, its components not being separately distinguishable by the naked eye.
LaVerne couldn't believe the difference between what she saw with her naked eye and through the telescope.
She has also nabbed Jupiter with the naked eye 12 minutes after sunrise and Mars shortly before sunset during its 2003 apparition.
You obviously can't see this with the naked eye," comments Richard Zettler of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Philadelphia.