mythomania

(redirected from mythomaniac)
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mythomania

(mĭth′ə-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
A compulsion to embroider the truth, engage in exaggeration, or tell lies.

myth′o·ma′ni·ac′ (-ăk′) n.

mythomania

(mĭth″ō-mā′nē-ă) [Gr. mythos, myth, + mania, madness]
Abnormal tendency to lie and exaggerate.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there is a paranoid, mythomaniac edge to his acting out.
Wilson is played by the British comedian Steve Coogan, a genius of bathos and a failure specialist who captures--as no one else could--the never-ending deflations of this voluble, mythomaniac figure.
More important, Wells presents the data that make the case that Ellsberg is a mythomaniac and a poseur.
To detractor-in-chief Richard Aldington, author of a hugely controversial 1955 biography, the soldier-scholar who strove for immortality in The Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1935) was "an impudent mythomaniac.
Yet, as we leave the valedictory Cervantes for the silent dust-jacket, we realize that it had to take someone as single-minded and as self-denying as Roscioni to contravene temporality's unforgiving law in order to grant Gadda's wish, and playing the no-nonsense but charmed chronicler to our errant knight's mythomaniac fantasies represents not only quite some feat of scholarship but also a moving personal homage to potent artistic delusions.
In Chapter 1, "The Mythomaniac Narrator and the Hidden Author," Conte defines the "hidden author" of his title: "as a deliberate strategy, the author refuses to play a direct role in the account, preferring to make himself a detached external observer, like the reader whose complicity he is seeking" (26-7).
Rodrigue Sleiman and Tarek El Bacha's 'Nice to Meet You' is in a completely different vein: it follows mythomaniac gas delivery man Eddy and his tendency to believe and repeat imaginary stories to all he meets.
Differing accounts of the events come from a movie house janitor (Henry Stram), tormented over his failure to intervene; a thief (Aaron Lohr), a mythomaniac who lured the victim to the park to help steal a hidden stash of mob money and then claims credit for the crimes in a bid for fame; the wife (Menzel), a hotsy moll in flaming red; and a medium (Mary Testa), channeling the dead man (Kudisch) after his psychic interruption disturbed her seance.
With chilling detachment he diagnoses himself as spiritually poor, poor in will and poor in love; most frightening of all is his assurance that his alienation and his negation of men and society are not the result of anger or a source of suffering, but then he also calls himself a mythomaniac.
Sedentary most of the time, Finney brings genuine warmth to the old mythomaniac without any servings of ham, and his way with words makes his tales delectable.
The implication is that Said the mythomaniac discredits the entire Palestinian "narrative" of diaspora and dispossession.
Fortunately, that great mythomaniac and novelist-adventurer Andre Malraux, then de Gaulle's Minister of Culture, came to the rescue.