myoglobinuria


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myoglobinuria

 [mi″o-glo″bin-u´re-ah]
the presence of myoglobin in the urine.

my·o·glo·bi·nu·ri·a

(mī'ō-glō'bi-nyū'rē-ă),
Excretion of myoglobin in the urine; results from muscle degeneration, which releases myoglobin into the blood; occurs in certain types of trauma (crush syndrome), advanced or protracted ischemia of muscle, or as a paroxysmal process of unknown etiology.

myoglobinuria

(mī′ə-glō′bə-no͝or′ē-ə)
n.
Excretion of myoglobin in the urine.

myoglobinuria

[-glō′binoo͡r′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, mys + L, globus + Gk, ouron, urine
the presence of myoglobin, an oxygen-storing pigment of muscle tissue, in the urine. The condition usually occurs after massive muscle injury, physical trauma, or electrical injury. The urine has a brown discoloration.

myoglobinuria

Internal medicine The loss of myoglobin in urine
Myoglobinuria, etiology  
Connective Tissue Disease Polymyositis, dermatomyositis
Hereditary Carnitine palmityl transferase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type V–phosphorylase deficiency, McArdle's disease, myopathies associated with glycogen or lipid storage, paroxysmal familial myoglobinuria, malignant hyperthermia, periodic paralysis
Infection
 Bacteria–eg, Legionnaire's disease
 Parasites–eg, trichinosis, toxoplasmosis
 Viral–eg, EBV, influenza, herpes
Toxins Alcohol–alcoholic myopathy, carbon monoxide, phencyclidine–PCP, 'angel dust', ethylene glycol, insect venom, some diuretics, Haff disease–historic interest
Trauma Crush injury, excess/prolonged physical exertion–eg, marathon running, severe muscle injury, crush injury
Etcetera Hyperthermia, infarction due to vascular occlusion, seizures
The diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion–especially with bright red urine and ↑ CK

my·o·glo·bi·nu·ri·a

(mī'ō-glō-bi-nyūr'ē-ă)
Excretion of myoglobin in urine; results from muscle degeneration, which releases myoglobin into the blood; occurs in certain types of trauma (e.g., crush syndrome), advanced or protracted ischemia of muscle, or as a paroxysmal process of unknown etiology.

myoglobinuria

The presence of MYOGLOBIN in the urine. This may occur when there is an excessive rate of breakdown of muscle (rhabdomyolysis) with release of myoglobin into the blood.

Myoglobinuria

Reddish urine caused by excretion of myoglobin, a breakdown product of muscle.

Meyer-Betz,

Friedrich, 20th century German physician.
Meyer-Betz disease - Synonym(s): Meyer-Betz syndrome
Meyer-Betz syndrome - excretion of myoglobin in the urine resulting from muscle degeneration. Synonym(s): Meyer-Betz disease; myoglobinuria

myoglobinuria

excretion of myoglobulin in urine, indicative of muscle tissue breakdown

myoglobinuria

the presence of myoglobin in the urine. It is evidence of severe muscle degeneration, though all such degenerations do not necessarily lead to myoglobinuria; it depends on the content of the pigment in the muscle and the renal threshold for it. The urine is red to dark red-brown, but in severe cases may be almost black.
Enlarge picture
Myoglobinuria in a horse with exertional myopathy. By permission from Knottenbelt DC, Pascoe RR, Diseases and Disorders of the Horse, Saunders, 2003

paralytic myoglobinuria
see paralytic myoglobinuria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, and lactic acidosis all develop.
Cocaine is known to cause acute rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuria.
A rise in plasma creatine phosphokinase concentration and myoglobinuria, without clinical sequelae, were noted post delivery.
This treatment may have contributed to the number of FP cases reported, since early aggressive treatment may prevent the progression from myoglobinuria to ARF.
Further, vigorous exercise can lead to myoglobinuria and hematuria.
The myoglobinuria was considered responsible for the renal failure.
They further defined three types of muscle disorders associated with statins: myalgia--muscle pain or weakness without CK elevation, myositis--pain or weakness with CK elevation, and rhabdomyolysis--muscle symptoms with CK elevation greater than 10 times the upper limit of normal, usually associated with myoglobinuria.
Acute tubular necrosis after rhabdomyolysis does not always appear to parallel the degree of muscle damage, but it may be related to other factors that potentiate the effects of myoglobinuria, such as hypotension, acidosis, and volume depletion.
Additional signs may include elevated creatinine phosphokinase, myoglobinuria (rhabdomyolysis), and acute renal failure.
Skeletal Muscle Effects Cases of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure secondary to myoglobinuria have been reported with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, including LIVALO .
Myoglobinuria associated with mechanical bull use has been described twice in the literature, both cases in otherwise healthy males with no other orthopedic injury.