myiasis


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Related to myiasis: nasal myiasis

myiasis

 [mi-i´ah-sis]
invasion of the body by the larvae of flies, characterized as cutaneous (subdermal tissue), gastrointestinal, nasopharyngeal, ocular, or urinary, depending on the region invaded.

my·i·a·sis

(mī-ī'ă-sis),
Any infection due to invasion of tissues or cavities of the body by larvae of dipterous insects.
[G. myia, a fly]

myiasis

/my·i·a·sis/ (mi-i´ah-sis) invasion of the body by the larvae of flies, characterized as cutaneous (subdermal tissue), gastrointestinal, nasopharyngeal, ocular, or urinary, depending on the region invaded.

myiasis

(mī′ə-sĭs, mī-ī′ə-sĭs)
n. pl. myiases (mī′ə-sēz′)
1. Infestation of tissue by fly larvae.
2. A disease resulting from infestation of tissue by fly larvae.

myiasis

[mī′yəsis]
Etymology: Gk, myia, fly, osis, condition
infection or infestation of the body by the larvae of flies, usually through a wound or an ulcer, but rarely through intact skin.

my·i·a·sis

(mī-ī'ă-sis)
Any infection due to invasion of tissues or cavities of the body by larvae of dipterous insects.
[G. myia, a fly]

myiasis

Infestation of the skin, wounds or body apertures by fly larvae. Fly-blown and maggotty wounds are common in the tropics and the infestation does little harm. The African tumbu fly deposits eggs through the intact skin and the larva grows into an adult fly that then emerges. Bot fly egg larvae, deposited by mosquitos, penetrate the skin. Some fly larvae gain access to the sinuses around the nose and can cause severe damage.

myiasis

An infection or infestation of tissues or cavities by larvae of flies. In the eye (called ophthalmomyiasis or ocular myiasis) the larvae may affect the ocular surface, the conjunctival sac, the intraocular tissues or occasionally the deeper orbital tissues. Treatment consists of the mechanical removal of the larvae following topical anaesthesia.

my·i·a·sis

(mī-ī'ă-sis)
Any infection due to invasion of tissues or cavities of the body by larvae of dipterous insects.
[G. myia, a fly]

myiasis

invasion of the body by the larvae of flies, characterized as cutaneous (subdermal tissue), gastrointestinal, nasopharyngeal, ocular or urinary, depending on the region invaded.

blowfly myiasis
see cutaneous myiasis (below).
cutaneous myiasis
infestation of devitalized skin, skin covered by hair or wool fouled by feces or urine, or skin wounds by maggots of Lucilia spp., Phormia spp., Calliphora spp. Sheep are especially susceptible and large areas of skin may be destroyed and the sheep die as a result. Called also calliphorine myiasis, blowfly myiasis or strike and struck.
gastrointestinal myiasis
nasal myiasis
oestrusovis infestation.
ocular myiasis
oculovascular myiasis
gedoelstiahassleri infection, in which the eye is invaded by larvae per medium of the vascular system.
oestrid myiasis
includes invasion of tissues by larvae of Oestrus spp. and Hypoderma spp.
screw-worm myiasis
see screw-worm myiasis.
warble myiasis
References in periodicals archive ?
uk/news/world-news/horrific-video-shows-15-maggots-5354884) the Mirror , this is not the first case of Myiasis that has been reported.
Secondary: Caused by the necrobiophagous larvae (feed on dead tissues) also called as facultative myiasis.
Lucilia sericata (diptera: Calliphoridae) larvalarina bagli kedide ocular ve kopekte travmatik myiasis olgulari.
According to the degree of parasitism, myiasis can be classified as obligatory when larvae feed exclusively on living tissues, optional when larvae require necrotic and accidental tissues when they are caused by free diopters, but under certain circumstances can be ingested by the host and develop in it accidentally (1,5-7).
Cutaneous myiasis due to Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve (Diptera:Calliphoridae) in a chicken, Gallus domesticus.
Pin-site myiasis caused by screwworm fly, Colombia.
Hall, "A review of comparative aspects of myiasis in goats and sheep in Europe," Small Ruminant Research, vol.
4) Although myiasis in humans is rare, it is seen more frequently in regions where poor hygiene conditions prevail and where sheep and goat husbandry is common.
Additionally, considering that several Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Sarcophagidae species cause myiasis and can transmit pathogens to man and other vertebrates (Guimaraes & Papavero 1999), the need for field surveys to fully establish the distribution of these species becomes clear.
Urogenital myiasis results when flies lay their eggs near the exit of the urethra and the larvae proceed upward along the urogenital tract.
It also has a seasonal occurrence of myiasis during the months of August through October which coincides with the dates that our infected individuals were caught (Hensley 1976; Catts 1982).