myelosuppressive

myelosuppressive

 [mi″ĕ-lo-soo͡-pres´iv]
2. an agent that so acts.

myelosuppressive

/my·elo·sup·pres·sive/ (-sŭ-pres´iv)
2. an agent that so acts.

myelosuppressive

1. inhibiting bone marrow activity, resulting in decreased production of blood cells and platelets.
2. an agent having such properties.
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk of Febrile Neutropenia (FN) in Select Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy Regimens Abstract #3257, Poster, Sunday, Dec.
In the PIONEER study, Zarxio and the reference product both produced the expected reduction in the duration of severe neutropenia in cancer patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy (1.
Most commonly, anemia in cancer is due to the production of inflammatory cytokines and/or the effects of myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
Other contributing factors to low cell counts include the suppression of bone marrow progenitors by HIV-infected T cells, the myelosuppressive effect of certain drugs, infective and malignant bone marrow infiltration, and immune-mediated peripheral destruction of blood cells.
Immunosuppressant therapy with drugs and dosages high enough to be severely myelosuppressive, followed by HSCT, had been tested previously in patients with advanced, progressive MS, for which there is currently no broadly effective treatment.
However, she developed pancytopenia with WBC of 1500/ul and platelet count of 126,000/uL, which was thought to be secondary to a myelosuppressive effect of imatinib.
The myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are also significant factors associated with anemia (30), (31).
Approximately half of the unit demand increase reflects underlying Neulasta demand growth including increased first cycle penetration due to uses of newer, more myelosuppressive chemotherapy regimens.
Treatment includes therapeutic phlebotomy to keep the hematocrit below 45% and myelosuppressive cytoreduction to reduce the hematopoietic cells.
Therapy consists mainly of increasing immunosuppression, support of hematopoiesis with cytokines, and discontinuation of antibiotics or any drugs that might be myelosuppressive.
We recommend that the use of zidovudine should be restricted because it is myelosuppressive and may exacerbate chemotherapy-induced cytopenias.
FN is a common and potentially dangerous side effect of myelosuppressive chemotherapy leading to a heightened risk of infection, sometimes life-threatening, among people with cancer.