myelosuppression


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suppression

 [sŭ-presh´un]
the act of holding back or checking.
1. the stopping or inhibition of something, such as a secretion, excretion, normal discharge, or other function.
2. in psychiatry, conscious inhibition of an unacceptable impulse or idea as contrasted with repression, which is unconscious.
3. in genetics, a second mutation occurring at a site different from the first mutation site and able to mask or suppress the phenotypic expression of the first mutation; the organism appears to be reverted but is in fact doubly mutant.
4. inhibition of the erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium to prevent clinical attacks of malaria; used for prophylaxis.
5. cortical inhibition of perception of objects in all or part of the visual field of one eye during binocular vision.
bone marrow suppression reduction of the cell-forming functions of bone marrow, such as by a drug or because of replacement of the marrow by a disease process. Called also myelophthisis and myelosuppression.
labor suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as controlling uterine contractions prior to 37 weeks of gestation to prevent preterm birth. See also labor.
lactation suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the cessation of lactation and minimizing breast engorgement after childbirth.
overdrive suppression the suppression of intrinsic cellular automaticity by a rapid outside stimulus. In cardiology this refers to the inhibitory effect of a faster pacemaker on a slower pacemaker. The faster rate causes an accumulation of intracellular sodium, stimulating the sodium-potassium pump, which hyperpolarizes the cell so that it takes longer to reach threshold potential. This phenomenon is present in healthy His-Purkinje cells but decreases with a decrease in membrane potential and loss of fast sodium channels.

myelosuppression

/my·elo·sup·pres·sion/ (-sŭ-presh´un) bone marrow suppression.

myelosuppression

[-səpresh′ən] .

myelosuppression

Oncology The suppression–usually an undesired side effect–of normal BM activity, often the result of RT, chemotherapy, or various toxins. Cf Myelosuppressive therapy.

my·e·lo·sup·pres·sion

(mī'ĕ-lō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
A reduction in the ability of the bone marrow to produce blood cells: platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. Typically caused by cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During the period of myelosuppression, patients may be at an increased risk of infection or bleeding or may experience symptoms of anemia.
[G. myelos, marrow, + L. suppressio, pressing under]

my·e·lo·sup·pres·sion

(mī'ĕ-lō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
A reduction in the ability of the bone marrow to produce blood cells: platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells.
[G. myelos, marrow, + L. suppressio, pressing under]

myelosuppression

(mī´əlōsəpres´hən),
n the suppression of blood cell and platelet production in the bone marrow.

myelosuppression

depression of bone marrow activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this series, patients homozygous for mutant low-TPMT-activity alleles tended to develop severe myelosuppression often and early, within the first 4-6 weeks on azathioprine or 6-MP.
Hematopoietic growth factor has been used in patients with resistant myelosuppression
The most frequently reported adverse reactions (reported in 10% of patients) included myelosuppression, fluid retention events (pleural effusion, superficial localized edema, generalized edema), diarrhea, headache, musculoskeletal pain, and rash.
CTI believes the clinical efficacy and reduced myelosuppression seen in Phase 2 trials of pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis is also likely attributable to this unique kinase inhibition profile.
Infusions of GEMZAR longer than 60 minutes or dosing more frequently than weekly resulted in an increased incidence of clinically significant hypotension, severe flu-like symptoms, myelosuppression, and asthenia.
In clinical trials to date, obatoclax has been generally well tolerated, without any evidence of immuno- or myelosuppression.
The compound was safe and well-tolerated at all doses tested in 112 healthy male and female volunteers, with no evidence of myelosuppression (evidenced by no platelet reduction).
Existing therapies for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections, including CMV, in the transplant recipient population are limited by their lack of broad spectrum efficacy and major side effects, notably nephrotoxicity and myelosuppression," said Wendy P.
Reversible and transient myelosuppression was the most common side effect, with grade 3 or 4 toxicity observed in around 60% of patients.
Pacritinib has been well tolerated and has shown activity in alleviating MF-associated splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms with lack of myelosuppression.
In addition to clinical activity in multiple indications, obatoclax is generally well tolerated, and is without evidence of immuno- and myelosuppression.