myeloma

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Related to myelomas: multiple myeloma

myeloma

 [mi″ĕ-lo´mah]
1. a tumor composed of plasma cells of the type normally found in the bone marrow.
giant cell myeloma giant cell tumor (def. 1).
multiple myeloma see multiple myeloma.
plasma cell myeloma multiple myeloma.
solitary myeloma a variant of multiple myeloma in which there is a single localized tumor focus. Called also plasma cell tumor.

my·e·lo·ma

(mī'ĕ-lō'mă),
1. A tumor composed of cells derived from hemopoietic tissues of the bone marrow.
2. A plasma cell tumor.
[myelo- + G. -oma, tumor]

myeloma

/my·elo·ma/ (mi″ĕ-lo´mah) a tumor composed of cells of the type normally found in the bone marrow.
giant cell myeloma  see under tumor (1).
multiple myeloma  a disseminated type of plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by multiple bone marrow tumor foci and secretion of an M component, manifested by skeletal destruction, pathologic fractures, bone pain, the presence of anomalous circulating immunoglobulins, Bence Jones proteinuria, and anemia.
plasma cell myeloma  multiple m.
sclerosing myeloma  myeloma associated with osteosclerosis, most often manifested by peripheral neuropathy.
solitary myeloma  a variant of multiple myeloma in which there is a single localized tumor focus.

myeloma

(mī′ə-lō′mə)
n. pl. myelo·mas or myelo·mata (-mə-tə)
A malignant tumor formed by the cells of the bone marrow.

my′e·lo′ma·toid′ (-toid′) adj.

myeloma

[mī′əlō′mə]
Etymology: Gk, myelos + oma, tumor
an osteolytic neoplasm consisting of a profusion of cells typical of the bone marrow that may develop in many sites and cause extensive destruction of the bone. The tumor occurs most frequently in the ribs, vertebrae, pelvic bones, and flat bones of the skull. Intense pain and spontaneous fractures are common. The tumor is radiosensitive, and local lesions are curable. Kinds of myeloma are endothelial myeloma, extramedullary myeloma, giant cell myeloma, multiple myeloma, and osteogenic myeloma.

myeloma

Malignant plasmacytoma, multiple myeloma, multiple plasmacytoma of bone, myelomatosis, plasma cell myeloma Hematology A neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells in BM and extramedullary sites; if circumscribed, plasmacytoma Epidemiology MM comprises 10% of hematopoietic malignancies, causing 10,000 deaths/yr–US; ↑ with age; black:white 2:1 Clinical As the myeloma cells proliferate in BM, they cause osteolysis, resulting in pathologic fractures and industrial strength pain, anorexia, nausea, thirst, fatigue, muscle weakness, restlessness, confusion; BM replacement by neoplastic plasma cells results in ↑ infections and anemia due to displacement of normal WBCs, and erythroid series; excess Igs in circulation plug up renal tubules Lab Monoclonal Igs, often light chains, in serum, urine; ↑ Ca2+; normal PO4, normal alk phos Complications Painful pathologic fractures, anemia, hypercalcemia, renal failure, recurrent bacterial infections Treatment 1º chemotherapy: Melphalan and prednisone; VAD–vincristine, Adriamycin, dexamethasone in new cases; IFN-α has been used for maintenance; myeloablative therapy, allogeneic BMT from HLA-matched siblings. See Clear cell, myeloma, Indolent myeloma, Myeloma kidney, Solitary myeloma.

my·e·lo·ma

(mī'ĕ-lō'mă)
1. A tumor composed of cells derived from hemopoietic tissues of the bone marrow.
2. A plasma cell tumor.
[myelo- + G. -oma, tumor]

myeloma

A tumour derived from a lymphocyte. See LYMPHOMA, MYELOMATOSIS.

myeloma

a cancerous tumour of the bone marrow.

Myeloma

A tumor that originates in bone marrow and usually spreads to more than one bone.

myeloma

a disease of older people characterized by bone destruction (causing e.g. march fracture, vertebral collapse and heel pain, hypercalcaemia), bone marrow infiltration (causing e.g. anaemia, thrombocytopenia and easy bruising, low white blood cell count and proneness to recurrent infection) and renal impairment (i.e. hyperuricaemia and gout), with neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells, and characteristic excretion of immunoglobulin G (Bence Jones) protein in urine

my·e·lo·ma

(mī'ĕ-lō'mă)
1. A tumor composed of cells derived from hemopoietic tissues of bone marrow.
2. A plasma cell tumor.
[myelo- + G. -oma, tumor]

myeloma (mī´əlō´mə),

n a neoplasm characterized by cells normally found in the bone marrow.
myeloma, multiple,
n a primary malignant neoplasm of bone marrow characterized by proliferation of cells resembling plasma cells. Circumscribed radiolucencies are seen within the bones, and Bence Jones protein is usually found in the urine.
Enlarge picture
Multiple myeloma.
myeloma, plasma cell,
n a malignant neoplasm characterized by plasma cells. Solitary lesions may appear as radiolucencies in the bone and are sometimes considered benign, although most authorities believe that even these lesions become multiple and terminate fatally.
myeloma, solitary plasma cell,
n an incompletely understood monostotic neoplasm of bone that is histologically identical with multiple myeloma. Laboratory findings, positive in multiple myeloma, are usually negative in solitary plasma cell myeloma. Although usually benign, solitary plasma cell myelomas may be malignant.
myelomeningocele
(mī´əlōməning´gōsēl),
n a condition in which part of the spinal cord protrudes from between the bones of the vertebrae. The condition can result in paralysis.

myeloma

1. a B lymphocyte tumor.
2. multiple myeloma.

giant cell myeloma
giant cell tumor (1).
multiple myeloma
a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells, in which the plasma cells proliferate and invade the bone marrow, causing destruction of the bone and resulting in pathological fracture and bone pain. A secretory form of the disease is characterized by the presence of an immunoglobulin recognized as Bence Jones protein (monoclonal immunoglobulin), Bence Jones proteinuria, anemia, and lowered resistance to infection. It is the most common type of monoclonal gammopathy. A non-secretory form of the disease also occurs.
osteosclerotic myeloma
multiple myeloma associated with osteosclerosis (rather than bone destruction) and often with peripheral neuropathy.
plasma cell myeloma
see multiple myeloma (above).
myeloma protein
the immunoglobulin molecules produced by myeloma cells. See gammopathy.

Patient discussion about myeloma

Q. Multiple Myeloma what and how is it treated and what is MGUF

A. Were you referring by any chance to MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance)? It's a condition that resembles myeloma but is much more widespread and by itself isn't considered malignant. It may, however, deteriorate to multiple myeloma over the years.

Myeloma is treated with chemotherapy of various kinds, and sometimes with bone marrow transplantation with the patients own bone marrow.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/multiplemyeloma.html

More discussions about myeloma
References in periodicals archive ?
com), Jack Aiello (NCI steering committee member, well-known myeloma patient advocate), Jenny Ahlstrom (www.
Mike Thompson, MD, PhD (ASCO Social Media Work Group, co-founder #mmsm Twitter group) and Myeloma Crowd patient advocate Lizzy Smith.
About Myeloma Crowd/CrowdCare Foundation The Myeloma Crowd is a division of the CrowdCare Foundation, a patient-driven 501(c)3 non-profit organization.
I am delighted to work with an organization whose commitment is to further advances in our management of myeloma patients," says Dr.
I'm excited to help myeloma patients and caregivers give input into what research is done--and how it's funded," says popular myeloma blogger and patient activist Pat Killingsworth.
The Myeloma Crowd Research Initiative is an innovative effort to help improve research and therapy for patients with myeloma in the new era of connectivity," says Dr.