granulocytic sarcoma

(redirected from myeloid sarcoma)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

sarcoma

 [sahr-ko´mah] (pl. sarcomas, sarco´mata.)
A tumor, often highly malignant, composed of cells derived from connective tissue such as bone, cartilage, muscle, blood vessel, or lymphoid tissue; sarcomas usually develop rapidly and metastasize through the lymph channels. Different types are named for the specific tissue they affect: fibrosarcoma in fibrous connective tissue; lymphosarcoma in lymphoid tissues; osteosarcoma in bone; chondrosarcoma in cartilage; rhabdosarcoma in muscle; and liposarcoma in fat cells. adj., adj sarco´matous.
Abernethy's sarcoma a malignant fatty tumor occurring mainly on the trunk.
alveolar soft part sarcoma one with a reticulated fibrous stroma enclosing groups of sarcoma cells enclosed in alveoli walled with connective tissue.
botryoid sarcoma (sarcoma botryoi´des) an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma arising in submucosal tissue, usually in the upper vagina, cervix uteri, or bladder neck in young children and infants, presenting grossly as a polypoid grapelike structure.
endometrial stromal sarcoma a pale, polypoid, fleshy, malignant tumor of the endometrial stroma.
Ewing's sarcoma a malignant tumor of the bone that arises in medullary tissue, usually found in cylindrical bones, with pain, fever, and leukocytosis as prominent symptoms; called also Ewing's tumor.
giant cell sarcoma a malignant form of giant cell tumor of bone.
granulocytic sarcoma chloroma.
immunoblastic sarcoma of B cells an aggressive B-cell lymphoma believed to arise from transformed interfollicular B lymphocytes, which in many cases is associated with a preexisting immunologic disorder, e.g., Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or with an immunocompromised state.
immunoblastic sarcoma of T cells a group of T-cell lymphomas comprising tumors derived from T lymphocytes in the paracortical area arising from a mixture of small lymphocytes and many large transformed cells; the latter are characterized by one or more small but distinctly eosinophilic nucleoli.
Kaposi sarcoma a multicentric, malignant neoplastic vascular proliferation characterized by bluish red cutaneous nodules, usually on the lower extremities, most often on the toes or feet; the nodules slowly increase in size and number and spread to more proximal sites. Tumors often remain confined to skin and subcutaneous tissue, but widespread visceral involvement may occur. The condition occurs endemically in certain parts of Central Africa and Central and Eastern Europe, and a particularly virulent and disseminated form occurs in immunocompromised patients such as transplant recipients and those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Human herpesvirus 8 has been implicated as a causative agent.
lymphatic sarcoma diffuse lymphoma.
osteogenic sarcoma a malignant primary tumor of bone composed of a malignant connective tissue stroma with evidence of osteoid, bone, and/or cartilage formation; depending upon the dominant component, classified as osteoblastic, fibroblastic, or chondroblastic.
pseudo–Kaposi sarcoma unilateral subacute to chronic dermatitis, often with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, occurring in association with underlying arteriovenous fistula, which closely resembles Kaposi sarcoma both clinically and histologically.
reticulum cell sarcoma histiocytic lymphoma.

gran·u·lo·cyt·ic sar·co·ma

a malignant tumor of immature myeloid cells, frequently subperiosteal, associated with or preceding granulocytic leukemia.
See also: chloroma.
Synonym(s): myeloid sarcoma

granulocytic sarcoma

See chloroma.

gran·u·lo·cyt·ic sar·co·ma

(gran'yū-lō-sit'ik sahr-kō'mă)
A malignant tumor of immature myeloid cells, frequently subperiosteal, associated with or preceding granulocytic leukemia.
See also: chloroma
Synonym(s): myeloid sarcoma.

granulocytic

pertaining to granulocytes.

granulocytic leukemia
see myelocytic leukemia.
granulocytic sarcoma
extramedullary growth of multiple, focal granulocytic neoplasm. They may be neutrophilic or eosinophilic. Lesions may be in any tissue but favor lung, gut and skin. They have a greenish color due to the exposure of myeloperoxidase to air. Called also chloroma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the right thyroid mass was positive for malignant cells, consistent with myeloid sarcoma (MS) (figure 2).
Many take the form of tumor masses as myeloid sarcoma.
Finn had myeloid sarcoma, an extremely rare form of acute myeloid leukaemia, which in itself is more common in people over the age of 50.
Among those present to celebrate the opening was 12-year-old Emma Bell, who three years ago was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma.
Among those there to celebrate the opening was 12-year-old Emma Bell, who three years ago was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma the size of a large orange that was growing behind her nose and partway down her throat.
1,2) Myeloid sarcoma can occur de novo, concurrently or following the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemias (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).
Other more-rare entities that differ in treatment but morphologically resemble ILC and may involve the breast include metastases of signet ring carcinomas from other primary sites, sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma, myeloid sarcoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and plasma cell dyscrasias.
Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary mass of immature myeloid cells that can be associated with acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.
Metodologia: con el fin de conocer los aspectos mas relevantes de esta enfermedad como frecuencia, manifestaciones clinicas y diagnostico histopatologico, tratamiento y pronostico, reportados en la literatura, se utilizaron las bases de datos Medline y Ovid y se hizo la busqueda con las palabras clave granulocytic sarcoma, extramedullary leukemia, myeloid sarcoma, female genital tract, uterus, uterine cervix, endometrium.
Myeloid sarcoma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of malignant myeloid cells that occur in the presence of myeloid leukemia.
However, in some cases of ALCL, the malignant cells themselves may show histiocytic morphology (Figure 2, A through C), with round or bean-shaped nuclei and abundant pale cytoplasm, raising a differential diagnosis that includes myeloid sarcoma with monocytic differentiation and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.