myeloablation

myeloablation

 [mi″ĕ-lo-ab-la´shun]
severe myelosuppression. adj., adj myeloab´lative.

myeloablation

/my·elo·ab·la·tion/ (mi″ĕ-lo-ab-la´shun) the severe or complete depletion of bone marrow cells; as the administration of high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy prior to bone marrow transplantation.myeloab´lative

myeloablation

[mī′əlō·ablā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, myelos, marrow; L, ab, latus carried away
severe myelosuppression. See also bone marrow suppression.

myeloablation

(mī″ĕ-lō-a-blā′shŏn) [ myelo- + ablation]
Suppression of the ability of bone marrow to produce blood cells, e.g., by chemotherapy or radiation therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oral mucositis almost always occurs in patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (>80% incidence of severe mucositis) and is common (40-100% incidence) in patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation, where the incidence and severity of oral mucositis depends greatly on the nature of the conditioning regimen used for myeloablation.
The specifics of myeloablation are beyond the scope of this review.
To validate this possibility, we chose allogeneic HSCT as a model system, because BM content varies widely from the short period of time between myeloablation and full recovery.
HSCT has become a treatment of choice for many diseases in adults and children and myeloablation as a conditioning regimen is an important part of a successful outcome.
Myeloablation therapy and transplantation itself have been previously published elsewhere (10) and go beyond the scope of our article.
An autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation technique that achieves lymphoablation without myeloablation proved effective against severe refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a preliminary study.
Non-myeloablative HSCT is usually preferred in order to reduce treatment-related mortality, except in younger patients, where full myeloablation is still often used.
Pharmalink currently has three clinical phase development projects mature for out-licensing: Nefecon(R), an effective treatment of IgA nephropathy; Xepol(R), the first effective treatment of neurology indication post-polio syndrome; and Busulipo(TM), a safer alternative for myeloablation prior to bone marrow transplantation.
An international team of researchers report that "mini" transplants of bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells-defined as transplant without myeloablation and its sometimes fatal consequences-can be effective against a variety of hematologic malignances and may even prove superior to conventional transplants.
Itiitnune suppression rather than myeloablation is the basis for achieving donor hematopoietic engraftment.