myelinated

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Related to myelinatedly: myelinated nerve, myelinated fibers

sheath

 [shēth]
a tubular case or envelope.
arachnoid sheath the delicate membrane between the pial sheath and the dural sheath of the optic nerve.
carotid sheath a portion of the cervical fascia enclosing the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, vagus nerve, and sympathetic nerves supplying the head.
connective tissue sheath of Key and Retzius endoneurium.
crural sheath femoral sheath.
dural sheath the external investment of the optic nerve.
femoral sheath the fascial sheath of the femoral vessels.
Henle's sheath endoneurium.
lamellar sheath the perineurium.
medullary sheath myelin sheath.
myelin sheath (nerve sheath) the sheath surrounding the axon of myelinated nerve cells, consisting of concentric layers of myelin formed in the peripheral nervous system by the plasma membrane of Schwann cells, and in the central nervous system by the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes. It is interrupted at intervals along the length of the axon by gaps known as nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is an electrical insulator that serves to speed the conduction of nerve impulses (see saltatory conduction).
pial sheath the innermost of the three sheaths of the optic nerve.
root sheath the epidermic layer of a hair follicle.
sheath of Schwann neurilemma.
synovial sheath synovial membrane lining the cavity of a bone through which a tendon moves.
tendon sheath a lubricated fibrous or synovial layer of tissue in which the tendon is housed and through which it moves.

my·e·li·nat·ed

(mī'ĕ-li-nāt'ed),
Having a myelin sheath.
Synonym(s): medullated (2)

myelinated

/my·eli·nat·ed/ (mi´ĕ-lĭ-nāt″ed) having a myelin sheath.

myelinated

(mī′ə-lə-nā′tĭd)
adj.
Having a myelin sheath: myelinated nerve fibers.

myelinated

[mī′əlinā′tid]
(of a nerve) having a myelin sheath.

my·e·li·nat·ed

(mī'ĕ-li-nā-tĕd)
Having a myelin sheath.
Synonym(s): medullated (2) .

myelinated

Possessing a MYELIN sheath.

myelinated

having a myelin sheath.

Patient discussion about myelinated

Q. What is Myelin?

A. As part of the nervous system, myelin lines nerve fibers to protect and insulate neurons. Myelin aids in the quick and accurate transmission of electrical current carrying data from one nerve cell to the next. When myelin becomes damaged, the process involves numerous health conditions, including multiple sclerosis.

Dysfunction in the myelin of nerve fibers causes the interruption of smooth delivery of information. Either nerve impulses can be slowed, such that we can't pull our hand away in time to avoid being burned, or mixed up, so we aren't able to determine if a pan is hot in the first place. This is akin to a pet chewing on a wire, causing the device to dysfunction. When problems arise in nerves of the PNS, neuropathy might result, and when injury affects the nerves of the CNS, multiple sclerosis is often diagnosed.

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