mycotoxicosis


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Related to mycotoxicosis: aflatoxin

mycotoxicosis

 [mi″ko-tok-sĭ-ko´sis]
1. poisoning due to a fungal or bacterial toxin.
2. poisoning due to ingestion of toxic fungi such as mushrooms; see mushroom poisoning.

my·co·tox·i·co·sis

(mī'kō-tok'si-kō'sis),
Poisoning due to the ingestion of preformed substances produced by the action of certain fungi on particular foodstuffs or ingestion of the fungi themselves; for example, ergotism.
[myco- + G. toxikon, poison, + -osis, condition]

mycotoxicosis

/my·co·tox·i·co·sis/ (mi″ko-tok-sĭ-ko´sis)
1. poisoning due to a fungal or bacterial toxin.
2. poisoning due to ingestion of fungi, especially mushrooms; see also Amanita.

mycotoxicosis

(mī′kō-tŏk′sĭ-kō′sĭs)
n.
Poisoning caused by ingestion of a mycotoxin.

mycotoxicosis

[mī′kōtok′sikō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, mykes + toxikon, poison, osis, condition
a systemic poisoning caused by toxins produced by fungal organisms.

my·co·tox·i·co·sis

(mī'kō-tok-si-kō'sis)
Poisoning due to the ingestion of preformed substances produced by the action of some fungi on particular foodstuffs or by ingestion of the fungi themselves; e.g., ergotism.
[myco- + G. toxikon, poison, + -osis, condition]

my·co·tox·i·co·sis

(mī'kō-tok-si-kō'sis)
Poisoning due to ingestion of preformed substances produced by action of some fungi on particular foodstuffs or ingestion of fungi themselves; e.g., ergotism.
[myco- + G. toxikon, poison, + -osis, condition]

mycotoxicosis

1. poisoning due to a fungal toxin.
2. poisoning due to ingestion of fungi is poisoning caused by fungal toxins, resulting from the ingestion of moldy feeds or as toxins produced by fungi that parasitize living plants externally or live in the tissues of the plants as endophytes.
The common toxic fungi on standing crops are Alternaria, Claviceps, Fusarium, Helminthosporium and Rhizopus spp. On stored feeds the common ones are Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium. There are a number of identified specific poisonous fungi, but it is probable that there are a great number of fungal toxic incidents that go unnoticed. Food animals are frequently exposed to fungi on moldy stored food and also on standing plants and on the litter lying at the ground surface in a pasture. See also facial eczema, ryegrass staggers, lupinus poisoning, stachybotryotoxicosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the entire livestock of laying hens we found the following clinical signs mycotoxicosis disease: depression and drowsiness, mucous membranes of the mouth, tongue, pharynx, and at the base of the beak has foci of necrosis, faeces are watery with traces of blood, lurching walk, motor dysfunction, ruffled, dim, dirty feathers, sometimes alopecia areas, lack or loss of egg production, eggs are of low weight with thin shell.
These problems can include simple allergic responses such as eye, nose and throat irritation, excessive colds and flu, lowered immune systems, acute mycotoxicosis (a severe reaction to mold produced toxic chemicals), mold induced asthma, mold lung infections like aspergillosis, and chronic debilitating lung diseases such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis.
Association of Fusarium mycotoxicosis with failure in applying an induction of parturition program with PGF2-alpha and oxytocin in sows.
Experimental mycotoxicosis in chickens induced by ochratoxin A and penicillic acid and intervention with natural plant extracts.
Mycotoxins comprise a structurally diverse family of naturally occurring fungal toxins elaborated by several species of fungi, which cause mycotoxicosis in single or mycotoxicoses in mixed conditions.
The variation in the biological titer could be due to stage of death, susceptibility of the birds, virus storage conditions and concurrent problems of birds especially mycotoxicosis.
These two fungi are included in my panel of nine fungi (molds), which I routinely use in the laboratory evaluation of all my patients with chronic mold allergy and systemic mycotoxicosis.
Lipoic acid as a potential first agent for protection from mycotoxins and treatment of mycotoxicosis.
Consumption of mycotoxins at a very low level can cause sever mycotoxicosis but it can also result in damage to innate and acquired resistance to infections (Dalcero et al.
The ill effects of mycotoxicosis is prevented by the addition of non-nutritive and natural adsorbent materials to contaminated feed in order to selectively bind the mycotoxins during the digestive process and make it harmless to the bird.