mycosis fungoides


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mycosis

 [mi-ko´sis]
any disease caused by fungi.
mycosis fungoi´des a chronic or rapidly progressive form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (formerly thought to be of fungal origin), which in some cases evolves into generalized lymphoma. It may be divided generally into three successive stages: premycotic, associated with intensely pruritic eruptions; infiltrated plaques, or mycotic, characterized by the presence of abnormal mononuclear cells (Sézary cells); and mushroom-like tumors that often ulcerate. The tumor stage (d'emblée type) may develop without preceding lesions or prodromal symptoms.
opportunistic mycosis a fungal or funguslike disease occurring as an opportunistic infection. Fungi that may become opportunistic pathogens include species of Aspergillus, Candida, Mucor, and Cryptococcus. Successful treatment of opportunistic mycoses depends on identification of the specific organism causing the infection. Without effective therapy a systemic infection of this type can be fatal.

my·co·sis fun·goi·'des

[MIM*254400]
a chronic progressive lymphoma arising in the skin that initially simulates eczema or other inflammatory dermatoses; the appearance of plaques is associated with acanthosis and bandlike infiltration of the upper dermis by a pleomorphic infiltrate including helper T lymphocytes with large, convoluted nuclei that also collect in clear spaces in the lower epidermis (Pautrier microabscesses); in advanced cases, ulcerated tumors and infiltration of lymph nodes may occur.
See also: Sézary syndrome.

mycosis fungoides

[fung·goi′dēz]
a rare chronic lymphomatous skin malignancy resembling eczema or a cutaneous tumor that is followed by microabscesses in the epidermis and lesions simulating those of Hodgkin's disease in lymph nodes and viscera. The condition is considered a distinctive entity by some specialists and a cutaneous manifestation of a malignant lymphoma by others.
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Mycosis fungoides

mycosis fungoides  

Hematology A rare–0.3/105/yr, malignant lymphoproliferation of paracortical T cells, usually helper, less often, suppressor subtypes that is 2-fold more common in older blacks Clinical Skin involvement precedes Sx by up to 2 yrs; the leukemic phase–Sezary syndrome–occurs in 80% and is accompanied by fever, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, lung involvement, eosinophilia, lymphocytosis, peripheral neuropathy, and periarteritis nodosa. Stages of ↑ aggression: Erythema stage, plaque stage, tumor stage, d'emblee stage Management Early RT and chemotherapy don't alter clinical disease

my·co·sis fun·goi·des

(mī-kō'sis fung-goyd'ēz)
A chronic progressive lymphoma arising in the skin that initially simulates eczema or other inflammatory dermatoses; in advanced cases, ulcerated tumors and infiltrations of lymph nodes may occur.

mycosis fungoides

A malignant tumour of T lymphocyte origin (lymphoma) affecting the skin and causing multiple flat growths that remain confined to the skin for many years. Spread to the lymph nodes and internal organs may occur at a late stage. Anticancer treatment is sometimes needed. The condition has nothing to do with fungus and was named before its true nature was known.

Mycosis fungoides

The most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This low-grade lymphoma primarily affects the skin. Generally, it has a slow course and often remains confined to the skin. Over time, in about 10% of cases, it can progress to the lymph nodes and internal organs.

Alibert,

Jean Louis Marc, French dermatologist, 1768-1837.
Alibert-Bazin syndrome - heterogenous group of malignant lymphomas characterized by the expansion of a clone of CD4+ (or helper) memory cells, primarily affecting the skin. Synonym(s): Alibert disease III; Auspitz dermatosis; cutaneous T-cell lymphoma; granuloma fungoides; mycosis fungoides
Alibert disease I - firm, thickened, irregularly shaped, pink or red growth that arises on and extends beyond an area of the skin that has been injured. Synonym(s): Alibert keloid; cicatricial keloid
Alibert disease II - infection caused by Leishmania tropica. Synonym(s): Baghdad boil; chiclero ulcer; cutaneous leishmaniasis; oriental sore
Alibert disease III - Synonym(s): Alibert-Bazin syndrome
Alibert keloid - Synonym(s): Alibert disease I

mycosis fungoides

chronic progressive lymphoma, characterized in the early stages by eczema and inflammatory dermatoses

my·co·sis fun·goi·des

(mī-kō'sis fung-goyd'ēz) [MIM*254400]
A chronic progressive lymphoma arising in the skin that initially simulates eczema or other inflammatory dermatoses; in advanced cases, ulcerated tumors and infiltrations of lymph nodes may occur.

mycosis fungoides,

n a rare, chronic, lymphomatous skin malignancy resembling eczema or a cutaneous tumor that is followed by microabscesses in the epidermis and lesions simulating those of Hodgkin disease in lymph nodes and viscera.

mycosis

pl. mycoses; any disease caused by fungi.

dermal mycosis
see ringworm, epizootic lymphangitis, sporotrichosis, swamp cancer. Called also dermatophytosis.
mycosis fungoides
a chronic, malignant, lymphoreticular neoplasm of the skin, and, in late stages, lymph nodes and viscera; a type of cutaneous lymphosarcoma involving T lymphocytes. It occurs in humans, dogs and cats.
guttural pouch mycosis
see guttural pouch mycosis.
opportunistic mycosis
a fungal or fungus-like disease occurring in an animal with a compromised immune system. Opportunistic organisms are normal resident flora that become pathogenic only when the host's immune defenses are altered, as in immunosuppressive therapy, in a chronic disease, such as diabetes mellitus, or during steroid or antibacterial therapy that upsets the balance of bacterial flora in the body.
superficial mycosis
those involving the superficial layers of the skin; typical of infections caused by dermatophytes.
systemic mycosis
fungal infection spread via the bloodstream and characterized by multiple granulomatous lesions in many organs. See aspergillosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, mucormycosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Emergence of leprosy in a patient with mycosis fungoides.
PUVA in patients with early-stage mycosis fungoides.
Poikilodermatous mycosis fungoides and atrophic large plaque parapsoriasis exhibit similar abnormalities of T cell antigen expression.
Hoppe, "Long-term outcome of 525 patients with mycosis fungoides and Seezary syndrome: clinical prognostic factors and risk for disease progression," Archives of Dermatology, vol.
Common chromosomal abnormalities in mycosis fungoides transformation.
Reassessment of lymphocytic atypia in the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides.
Mycosis fungoides in European Russia: no antibodies to human T cell leueemia virus type I structural proteins, but virus-like sequences in blood and saliva.
Roupe G: Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a child successfully treated with UVA1-light.
Ofuji papuloerythroderma associated with follicular musinosis in mycosis fungoides.
Cutaneous Lymphoma Group, as well as the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) in mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome, recommend the use of ECP for patients with erythrodermic CTCL (29, 32-33).
Clinicians' opinion about lymphocytopenia is controversial; Stevens et al have reported mycosis fungoides associated with idiopathic CD4+ T-lymphocytes (ICL) [8].