mycoplasma pneumonia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to mycoplasma pneumonia: viral pneumonia, Legionella pneumonia

mycoplasma pneumonia

a contagious disease of children and young adults caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. It is characterized by a 9- to 12-day incubation period and followed by symptoms of an upper respiratory infection, dry cough, and fever. Also called Eaton agent pneumonia, primary atypical pneumonia, walking pneumonia. See also cold agglutinin.
observations Harsh or diminished breath sounds and fine inspiratory rales are frequently heard. Pulmonary infiltrates visible on chest x-ray films may resemble those of bacterial or viral pneumonia and may persist for 3 weeks in untreated cases. Rarely, complications such as sinusitis, pleurisy, polyneuritis, myocarditis, or Stevens-Johnson syndrome may follow the pneumonia. In untreated adults prolonged cough, weakness, and malaise are common. Diagnosis is suggested by physical examination and by observation of the clinical course and elevated cold agglutinin level and is confirmed by a complement fixation test. Prognosis is favorable.
interventions Erythromycin or tetracycline, bed rest, a high-protein diet, and an adequate fluid intake are recommended. It is important that infants and people for whom a respiratory illness is particularly hazardous avoid contact with infected individuals.

mycoplasma pneumonia

A primary atypical pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which is associated with mini-epidemics that spread by aerosol or close contact to most individuals in closed populations (e.g., military boot camps, boarding schools, colleges), affecting those aged 5–20.
 
Clinical findings
Incubation ± 3 weeks; insidious onset of fever, malaise, headache, myalgia, low-grade fever, cough, chest pain and respiratory disease, from asymptomatic to rhinitis, pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis and pneumonia.

Lab
Leukocytosis, relative increase in PMNs, cold hemagglutinins, biologic false-positive VDRL.
 
Complications
Erythema multiforme, Raynaud’s disease, cold agglutinin haemolysis; less commonly, neurological, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal defects.
 
Treatment
Tetracycline, erythromycin.

Vaccine
None currently available.

mycoplasma pneumonia

Primary atypical pneumonia; walking pneumonia Infectious disease A primary atypical pneumonia by M pneumoniae, which causes miniepidemics that spread by aerosol or close contact, causing up to34 of a 'closed population'–military 'boot' camps, boarding schools, colleges–pneumonias, affecting ages 5-20 Clinical Incubation ± 3 wks; insidious onset of fever, malaise, headache, myalgia, low-grade fever, cough, chest pain, and respiratory disease from asymptomatic to rhinitis, pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis, pneumonia Lab Leukocytosis, relative ↑ in PMNs, cold hemagglutinins, biologic false positive VDRL Complications Erythema multiforme, Raynaud's phenomenon, cold agglutinin hemolysis; less commonly, neurologic, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal defects Treatment Tetracycline, erythromycin Vaccine Under development

Mycoplasma pneumonia

An incomplete bacterium that infects the lung.
Mentioned in: Erythema Multiforme
References in periodicals archive ?
After the first isolation of a macrolide-resistant strain in 2001, Japan reported a dramatic increase in macrolide resistance among children with mycoplasma pneumonia, and in 2011 resistance was >80% (12,13).
Further, complicated viral infections lead to secondary mixed infections caused by highly contagious bacterial diseases such as streptococcemia, pleuropneumonia, colibacillosis, pasteurellosis and mycoplasma pneumonia.
Aortic valve endocarditis associated with Legionella infection after Mycoplasma pneumonia.
Analysis of this contact network predicts that, despite the relatively low prevalence of mycoplasma pneumonia found among caregivers, the patterns of caregiver activity and the extent to which they are protected against infection may be fundamental to the control and prevention of mycoplasma outbreaks.
herpes, hepatitis, strep A, strep B, tuberculosis, RSV, influenza, legionella, mononucleosis, mycoplasma pneumonia, E.