mutualism

(redirected from mutualistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to mutualistic: Symbiotic Relationships

mutualism

 [mu´choo͡-al-izm]
the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it. adj., adj mutualis´-tic.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chū-ăl-izm),
Symbiotic relationship in which both species derive benefit. Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism.

mutualism

/mu·tu·al·ism/ (mu´choo-al-izm″) the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.

mutualism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chyū-ăl-izm)
Symbiotic relationship from which both species derive benefit.
Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism

mutualism

see SYMBIOSIS.

mutualism

the biological association of two animals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, this study is the first report involving crop responses to DSE inoculation under drought conditions, and a more comprehensive study to research the mechanism of mutualistic association between DSE and crops under drought conditions is necessary.
Mycorrhizal fungi that help the plants germinate stay with the orchids for the entirety of their lifespan, forming a mutualistic association.
Although mutualistic interactions among plants and animals have been studied before, a new direction in the field of biology and biodiversity work takes the concept to a higher level: plant-animal mutualistic networks, the study of connections between communities of organisms.
Influence of the mutualistic endophyte Fusarium oxysporum 162 on Meloidogyne incognita attraction and invasion.
2011; O'DOWD; PEMBERTON, 1998; PEMBERTON; TURNER, 1989; WALTER, 1996), which suggests the mutualistic relationships between plants and such organisms, since they can contribute to reduce the density of herbivores that occur therein (AGRAWAL, 1997; AGRAWAL et al.
Demodex mites--Commensals, parasites, or mutualistic organisms?
The bacteria that naturally colonize our bodies are friendly and mutualistic, taking up all of the space on and in our bodies upon which bacteria can grow.
Previous studies have provided evidence that Poecilochirus mites found on burying beetles can be parasitic (feeding on beetle eggs), mutualistic (reducing competition by feeding on fly eggs), or commensal (only as transportation).
A healthful diet leads to mutualistic bacteria, while an unhealthful diet and processed foods predispose to gut pathogens.
The nine chapters in the sections on General Biology and Ecology review an array of topics for which gobies are already well-known, such as the mutualistic association between gobies and alpheid shrimps, the cleaning behavior of Elacatinus species, and the excavation of burrows by mudskippers, and those for which they are less so, such as their life as predator and prey.
These findings address the need to find out exact symbiotic or mutualistic relationship of MQD fungi with H.