mutualism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mutualism

 [mu´choo͡-al-izm]
the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it. adj., adj mutualis´-tic.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chū-ăl-izm),
Symbiotic relationship in which both species derive benefit. Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism.

mutualism

/mu·tu·al·ism/ (mu´choo-al-izm″) the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.

mutualism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chyū-ăl-izm)
Symbiotic relationship from which both species derive benefit.
Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism

mutualism

see SYMBIOSIS.

mutualism

the biological association of two animals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequences of a biological invasion reveal the importance of mutualism for plant communities.
In thinking about the renewal of mutualism, then, the question that needs to be asked is: what is the collective ethic that will provide the impetus for individuals to embrace a social ethic of mutualism?
For mutualism to work, however, national governments need to be more far-sighted in the formulation of economic policy and more flexible in its implementation.
If this inequality holds, cooperative predator inspection is best explained by reciprocity; if not, then by-product mutualism can account for the behavior.
As noted, Waltz employs this passage to support his assertion that economic interdependence does not imply effacement of the units, but he fails to observe that mutualism is distinct from mechanical society.
Operationally, researchers have studied competition and mutualism using the "density-dependent" mortality model (Barnett and Carroll, 1987; Tucker et al.
Impacts of plant symbiotic fungi on insect herbivores: mutualism in a multitrophic context.
Although Iain McKay sheds new light on the economic thought of Proudhon, showing that the Frenchman had much more to say about economic relations than just mutualism, mutualism and modern mutualists are criticised because of negative consequences of the market.
Tenant leadership and control is central to the way WATMOS works - with co-operation and mutualism underpinning the ethos of the organisation.
According to Palmer, many prior studies of cooperation in nature, or mutualism, have focused on the "cheater problem": How can cooperation persist when both sides have an incentive to reap benefits without contributing to the common good?
This association, called mutualism, ensures that the tree shrew gets a meal while the plant gets nutrients from the animal's droppings so it can grow.
Looking at the properties of single-species populations and interspecific interactions, he describes population growth with no restraints, limited growth, population regulation, age-dependent growth, metapopulations and spatial ecology, life-history strategies, the metabolic theory of ecology, resource and spatial competition, mutualism, host-parasite interactions, predator-prey theory, and herbivore-plant interactions.