mutualism


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mutualism

 [mu´choo͡-al-izm]
the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it. adj., adj mutualis´-tic.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chū-ăl-izm),
Symbiotic relationship in which both species derive benefit. Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism.

mutualism

/mu·tu·al·ism/ (mu´choo-al-izm″) the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.

mutualism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chyū-ăl-izm)
Symbiotic relationship from which both species derive benefit.
Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism

mutualism

see SYMBIOSIS.

mutualism

the biological association of two animals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.
References in periodicals archive ?
These tightly-coupled mutualisms between ants and trees are still unknown in the temperate zone, though they do exist between ants and many common forest understory herbs, such as trillium and bloodroot, which provide similar food rewards for dispersing their seeds.
In such cases, habitat fragmentation or loss of native pollinators might compound the threat of climate change to mutualisms," Tucker Gilman, lead author of the paper, said.
My objectives are to: (1) provide the first account of the host-parasite interaction between Red-Rumped Caciques and Giant Cowbirds, (2) compare this interaction with previous studies of Giant Cowbirds and other hosts with particular emphasis on the possible egg and nestling mimicry by the parasite, and (3) evaluate the possible occurrence of a preening mutualism between caciques and cowbirds.
VIDEO EXTRA: Watch this video about clownfish and sea anemone mutualism at the National Geographic Web site: http://video.
Incidental mutualism and pollen specialization among bees.
When one organism attaches itself to another for the benefit of both, as in the case of yogic initiation, that is the form of symbiosis known as mutualism.
15) Further, "in utilizing the concept of 'community,' voluntary associations attempted to fashion collective liberal identifies and bonds of mutualism within a social order that focused on individualist doctrines inherent in the growth of liberal state and market structures.
Today's mutualism differs from pre-industrial mutualism in the degree to which modern transactions are commercialized, executed as an exchange for money.
However, the discovery of the nitrogen-fixing mutualism in ants has significant ecological implications given the dominance of ants in virtually all of the word's terrestrial ecosystems.
Less convincing is his discussion of craft mutualism when it moves outside the workplace context.