muscle herniation

muscle herniation

bulging of muscle belly (especially on contraction) through fascial openings, or congenital defect in compartment fascia, e.g. anterior and lateral lower-leg compartments
References in periodicals archive ?
Dynamic ultrasound findings of bilateral anterior tibialis muscle herniation in a pediatric patient.
Muscle herniation of the lower extremity is a rare entity and is often asymptomatic.
5 cm with resultant muscle herniation and outward bulge of tibialis anterior.
Sonography is advantageous as it is real time, muscle herniation is detected during dynamic examination, and nature of the lesion can be shown to the patient which helps in reassurance.
Muscle herniation through a fascial defect is rare, which requires repair of fascial defects.
Muscle herniation is suggested to be posttraumatic or spontaneous.
Muscle herniation through an overlying fascial defect is most commonly described in athletes or adults with occupations requiring excessive strain on the legs.
Tibialis anterior muscle herniation is a rare clinical entity and it may not be born in mind at first in the differential diagnosis.
The sonographic examination (with a Toshiba Aplio XG device provided with a 2D 7,5 MHz linear probe, PLT-704 SBT) carried out by a research assistant practicing diagnostic ultrasonography revealed a muscle herniation that became more apparent when the patient took squatting or lunging position (Figure 2a).
The finding most commonly encountered is muscle herniation, seen in 40% to 50% of patients.
Muscle herniation through this fascial defect can compress the nerve leading to radiating pain over the dorsum of the foot.
Another possibility is exertional compartment syndrome associated with a tear in the compartment fascia and muscle herniation.