mural

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Related to muralists: Mural painting

mural

 [mu´ral]
pertaining to or occurring in a wall of an organ or cavity.

mu·ral

(myū'răl),
Relating to the wall of any cavity.
[L. muralis; fr. murus, wall]

mural

/mu·ral/ (mūr´'l) pertaining to or occurring in the wall of a body cavity.

mural

[myo̅o̅′rəl]
Etymology: L, murus, wall
1 adj, pertaining to something that is found on or against the wall of a cavity, such as a mural thrombus on an interior wall of the heart.
2 n, a painting on a wall.

mu·ral

(myū'răl)
Relating to the wall of any cavity.
[L. muralis; fr. murus, wall]

mural

On the wall of a hollow organ or structure.

mural

pertaining to or occurring in a wall of an organ or cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The muralists detail their painting styles and their training and even specify how far they're willing to travel for a job.
As noted by the curator, Mexican 20th century art is "much more complex, pluralistic and prolific" than the works of the three great muralists, and this show illuminates that point vividly.
But the emerging giants also looked to European masters for guidance, and not only to the muralists.
The really good muralists will not just paint, but have empathy and understanding and be able to translate a neighborhood on to the wall," Golden said.
Drawing inspiration from the powerful murals of Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, Chicano muralists adopted mythic Mexican symbols to evoke cultural pride.
Since the days when nearly 80,000 literacy volunteers fanned out across the nation, muralists from twenty-two countries have gone forth.
It is as if these early artists lived in a terrible vacuum, isolated, cut off from most world movements, with no points of reference, except perhaps the Mexican muralists.
This was revealed to be of outstanding quality and probably painted by John Crace, who was one of the leading muralists of late eighteenth-century England.
In the following conversation, veteran muralist Olivia Gude passes on to emerging muralist Beatriz Santiago Munoz some of the history of the contemporary mural movement in Chicago, and they talk about women muralists and making and seeing large-scale images of women on the street.
Now take a time machine forward to 1946: Dean Fausett's career as one of the foremost landscapists, portraitists, and muralists in American realism is well on its way.
Laurance Hurlburt provides the interested reader with a well-illustrated and scholarly publication centering around murals created in the United States by the famed Mexican muralists, Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera and David Siqneiros.
The stirring murals are the result of a competition sponsored by Hilton Anaheim and MUZEO, Southern California's newest museum, to commission three talented muralists for the unique opportunity to have their work seen by tens of thousands of hotel guests and the public.