multivitamin


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multivitamin

(mŭl′tə-vī′tə-mĭn)
adj.
Containing many vitamins.
n.
A preparation containing many vitamins.

multivitamin

An over-the-counter and often self-prescribed nutritional supplement containing lipid-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and water-soluble vitamins (thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), B6, B12, C, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid and biotin). Multivitamins may also contain minerals—e.g., calcium, phosphorus, iron, iodine, magnesium, manganese, copper and zinc.

multivitamin

An often self-prescribed OTC diet supplement containing lipid-soluble vitamins–A, D, E, K; water-soluble vitamins–thiamin–vitamin B1, riboflavin–vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin C, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin; minerals–eg, calcium, phosphorus, iron, iodine, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc. See Decavitamin, Neural tube defects; Cf Megavitamin therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, "it is possible that effects of multivitamins could have been dill ferent in a study population with varying levels of educational attainment.
Researchers reported last month that the same trial showed that a daily multivitamin reduced the men's overall risk of cancer by 8 per cent.
Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men - The Physicians' Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial.
This study aimed to relate the timing and frequency of periconceptional multivitamin use to risk of a PTB or delivery of SGA infants.
Previous work by our group and others has suggested that periconceptional multivitamin use is related to reduced risk for preeclampsia, early preterm birth, and growth restriction.
Billions of dollars are spent on multivitamins each year in this country alone.
The analysis showed no significant associations between multivitamin use and the likelihood of developing cancer or cardiovascular disease or of dying.
MIDDLE-AGED women who take multivitamin pills to guard against heart disease and cancer may be wasting their time, according to new research.
But taking a multivitamin every day is one step that a special woman in your life needs to make part of her daily routine because it contains a very important vitamin--the B-vitamin called folic acid.
Taking a prenatal multivitamin fortified with folic acid before and during pregnancy reduces the risk of three childhood cancers: leukemia, brain tumors, and neuroblastoma, according to researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children at the University of Toronto.
While most multivitamin supplements found on retail shelves offer basic nutrient levels of little more than 100% of the daily value, Nature Made Multivitamins feature optimized levels of essential nutrients using the most up-to-date research," says John Metz, senior vice president.
A multivitamin with iron can provide your daily requirement, but before taking an iron-only supplement, talk to a nutritionist--large doses of iron can be harmful.