multivitamin


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multivitamin

(mŭl′tə-vī′tə-mĭn)
adj.
Containing many vitamins.
n.
A preparation containing many vitamins.

multivitamin

An over-the-counter and often self-prescribed nutritional supplement containing lipid-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and water-soluble vitamins (thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), B6, B12, C, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid and biotin). Multivitamins may also contain minerals—e.g., calcium, phosphorus, iron, iodine, magnesium, manganese, copper and zinc.

multivitamin

An often self-prescribed OTC diet supplement containing lipid-soluble vitamins–A, D, E, K; water-soluble vitamins–thiamin–vitamin B1, riboflavin–vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin C, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin; minerals–eg, calcium, phosphorus, iron, iodine, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc. See Decavitamin, Neural tube defects; Cf Megavitamin therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just look for a well balanced multivitamin that meets 100 percent of the recommended daily allowance, not 200 to 500 percent.
There were 867 major cardiovascular events in the multivitamin group and 856 in the placebo group, or 11.
It is hard for us to recommend, at this point in time, taking a multivitamin to avoid cardiovascular disease," Dr.
Frequency of multivitamin use was categorised as partial use (1-3 weeks out of 6 possible weeks) or regular use (4-6 weeks out of 6 possible weeks) for the preconception and postconception periods.
Timing and frequency of multivitamin use were important, according to Dr.
No one knows either the quality or quantity of the multivitamins taken in this huge study.
The easiest way to be sure that you are getting the folic acid that you need daily is to take a multivitamin with folic acid daily.
Additional research is required to determine which components of the multivitamin can be attributed to the protective effects and which are associated with the folic acid component.
Try to get magnesium through food, as most multivitamins don't have the daily 100 percent requirement," says Bauer.
If you're generally healthy and eat a balanced diet, you should be able to get what you need from food alone and probably won't get much added benefit from a multivitamin.
Do you really need a daily multivitamin on top of it all?
A daily multivitamin reduces levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), according to researchers.