multivalent

(redirected from multivalency)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to multivalency: valence

multivalent

 [mul″ti-va´lent]
1. having a valence of two or more.
2. denoting an antiserum, vaccine, or antitoxin specific for more than one antigen or organism; called also polyvalent.

mul·ti·va·lent

(mŭl'tē-vā'lent),
1. In chemistry, having a combining power (valence) of more than one hydrogen atom.
2. Efficacious in more than one direction.
3. An antiserum specific for more than one antigen or organism.
4. Antigen or antibody with a combining power greater than two.
Synonym(s): polyvalent (1)

multivalent

/mul·ti·va·lent/ (-vāl´ent)
1. having the power of combining with three or more univalent atoms.
2. active against several strains of an organism.

multivalent

(mŭl′tĭ-vā′lənt, mŭl-tĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Genetics Of or relating to the association of three or more homologous chromosomes during the first division of meiosis.
2. Chemistry & Immunology Polyvalent.

mul′ti·va′lence n.

multivalent

[mul′tivā′lənt]
Etymology: L, multus + valere, to be strong
1 See polyvalent.
2 (in immunology) able to act against more than one strain of organism. Compare valence.

mul·ti·va·lent

(mŭl'tē-vā'lĕnt)
1. chemistry Having a combining power (valence) of more than one hydrogen atom.
2. Efficacious in more than one direction.
3. Any antiserum specific for more than one antigen or organism.
Synonym(s): polyvalent (1) .

multivalent

(of chromosomes) forming an association during prophase 1 of MEIOSIS. Compare BIVALENT.

multivalent

1. combining with several univalent atoms.
2. a vaccine that is active against several strains of an organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
2016) "Zen Noir vis-a-vis Myers-Briggs Personality Typology: Semiotic Multivalency as Grounds for Dialog," Journal of Religion & Film: Vol.
Dorothea may represent multivalency in the face of Casaubon's antiquated conception of history, but when one considers Eliot's enthusiasm for and participation in the Young Hegelian movement, Dorothea takes on the aspect of a post-Christian consciousness that is aware of the historicity of the theological stage of human development.
Closely focusing on language and form actually works against myopia in theoretically informed reading because one must attend to the multivalency of located words' contextual use value.
Fuzziness, or multivalency, is for Ashbery the centerpiece for such a strategy, enabling writer and reader to inhabit a homosexual subjectivity poetically.
The isoforms you describe are one of the possible ways for taking advantage of the multivalency of such a fixative.
It "may be defined as a transgressive modernist text," but "it also offer[s] a postmodern multivalency of meaning.
multivalency of monophthongization products (1988); and he will take off stratospherically into heights of theoretical abstraction long before resources of empirical testing are exhausted, and let that skew or even reverse the argument implied in the material he has so helpfully presented (1993: 28-41).
It is true, and commonplace, that public performed language in the period shared rhetorical assumptions, but it is also true that no preacher asked his flock to see, hear and feel with the multivalency characteristic of the theatre.
Any sense of the multivalency of symbols, or of their rootedness in history, is absent.
This is why I feel the performance analogy is useful here (despite Taruskin's reasonable injunction that the fields of performance and scholarship cannot automatically be reduced to one another); the text is so rich in its rhetorical fabric and semantic multivalency that any successful reading has to be as much a `performance' as a-textual exegesis.
This multivalency of theatrical space was lost as functions became increasingly specialised and political systems more authoritarian.
Webster's work on Mozart's operas, of which more is promised, is best known for his sharp attack on prevailing notions of unity ('To Understand Verdi and Wagner We Must Understand Mozart', 19th Century Music, xi (1987-8), 175; 'Mozart's Operas and the Myth of Musical Unity', Cambridge Opera Journal, ii (1990), 197; and another application of multivalency, 'The Analysis of Mozart's Arias', in Mozart Studies, ed.