multivalence


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mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lens, -vā'len-sē),
The state of being multivalent.

mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lĕns, -vā'lĕn-sē)
The state of being multivalent.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Rivera describes it, the poems invite the reader to become "an interpreter within" them as they grow and change out of an understanding of the multivalence of words.
visible the multivalence of power shaping subjectivities, societies and
Although the liseuse (woman reader) was a familiar figure in nineteenth-century French art, this book argues for the theme's heightened significance and multivalence in the 1870s and 1880s and its ties with widespread concerns about female literacy and controlling what women read.
2c), thus making possible the formation of a liposomal structure to produce multivalence of the GD1[alpha]-replica peptide.
tends to polarity, literary texts, especially Shakespearean ones, tend to multivalence.
Tensions over what it means to constitute a functional polity are revealed in the multivalence of terms Gower uses for the people: populus, which may signify collectivity in a neutral sense, and plebs and vulgus, which may denote the commons but in certain contexts also condemn the masses as a mob.
His interest in the ontological priority of the We-relationship (it 'is already given to me by the mere fact that I am born into the world of directly experienced social reality' [Schutz 1972: 165]) is as a means of grasping the concrete variety of face to-face relationships--in their intimacy, duration, frequency and multivalence.
Indeed, I am not even saying that if we recognize the role of multivalence, we need to abandon the probability idiom.
At times they're like actors discussing gestures and motivations; at other moments it seems like conversation we don't hear from Perils transposed to this other soundtrack--such is the multivalence of potential readings.
Variant vocalizations are, in any case, common in early biblical interpretation (Martin offers one additional example in chapter 9, "More Multivalence in the Song"), and the possibility of deliberate ambiguity is certainly worthy of further exploration.
Conversely, and as noted by Wasserman (244; 250), the cultural nationalism of the 1970s and 1980s gave way to multivalence in politics and ideology among the more current practices examined.