multivalence


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mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lens, -vā'len-sē),
The state of being multivalent.

mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lĕns, -vā'lĕn-sē)
The state of being multivalent.
References in periodicals archive ?
If one instead recognizes multivalence, one can proceed with fault standing as a partial truth.
The concept of intermediate membership states that everything is a matter of degree and it helps us to work with characteristics that exists in real world and are characterized by multivalence rather than by bivalence.
It is, as I've said, a structure that enables irony, scepticism, and multivalence but that also, I would insist, still finds a space for the approval of 'unsophistication'.
Purgatory's multivalence achieved its otherworldly variety through a host of this-worldly interests.
I think of the "between" more in terms of both/and, as a way of extending the grey-zone between the black and white in the direction of multivalence.
If the pornographic can be loosely defined against the erotic based on their degree of engagement with literary ambiguity, multivalence, complex use of metaphor and simile, or other such devices (the erotic being more literary and the pornographic less), then Miller confuses his pornography by allowing for a great deal of ambiguity and plurisignation at the moments when the pornographic reader would anticipate such elements being absent.
Krebs, Crabs, Kraut: The Multivalence of "'Krebs'" in Hemingway's "'Soldier's Home.
The multivalence of biblical texts and theological meanings.
The multivalence of the term 'reification' is in fact indicated by Warnes' article, which discusses "The Omniscope" alongside two stories that deal more explicitly with icons of public culture--"Propaganda by Monuments" and "The WHITES-ONLY Bench"--to elucidate Vladislavic's critique of "commodi-fication", or "the process whereby, for example, experience, memory, imagination, or even history itself, become reified, packaged, and marketed for consumption" (2000:84, my emphasis).
On the multivalence of spices and perfumes see Detienne 1972; Attridge 2003, 86--87, who also reads 2Cor 2, 14--17 as playing on the double use of perfume, for life and for death; the euodia is that of the Anointed One, anointed in life in anticipation of his death and anointed in a death that brought life to the whole world.
The second chapter focuses on the multivalence of the ubiquitous trope of "modern wonder," which conveyed a rational component in the adjective and a mythic component in the noun.