multitask


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multitask

(mŭl′ti-task″)
To work on several projects at the same time.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, they appear to be empowered by the ability to multitask, progressing on many tasks at once.
The review of the above literature suggests that the ability to multitask depends on the consistency between tasks and personal schema.
Even if it doesn't cause brain damage, allowing yourself to multitask will fuel any existing difficulties you have with concentration, organization, and attention to detail.
First of all, according to Nass, we don't really multitask because our processing isn't simultaneous, but rather sequential.
First, countries differ in terms of the time spent on different types of media (Livingstone, d'Haenens, & Hasebrink, 2001), and earlier research has demonstrated that people multitask most with the media that they most frequently use (Voorveld & Van der Goot, 2013).
Prof Sanbonmatsu said: "We showed that people who multitask the most are those who appear to be the least capable of multitasking effectively.
Many people have this overconfidence in how well they can multitask," points out Zheng Wang, lead author and assistant professor of communication.
Of course, no one should multitask by driving a vehicle while texting on a cell phone.
I feel like the professors here [at MIT] do have to accept that we can multitask very well, and that we do at all times.
Luckily, research from both cognitive psychology and neuroscience can provide important insights into what happens when students media multitask and how to combat negative effects on learning.
We may think we can multitask just fine, but handling a very fast-moving vehicle on a freeway, or navigating hectic urban traffic, is no time to put that idea on the test track.
It can be argued, that multitasking is a natural part of the modern classroom and work environments and students need to learn to multitask effectively--especially in today's high tech world.