multisystemic


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multisystemic

(mŭl′tē-sĭ-stĕm′ĭk, -stē′mĭk, -tī-)
adj.
Relating to a disease or condition that affects many organ systems of the body.

multisystemic

affecting more than one body system.

equine multisystemic eosinophilic epitheliotropic syndrome
includes chronic eosinophilic enteritis, eosinophilic granulomatous pancreatitis and eosinophilic dermatitis; there is no peripheral eosinophilia.
multisystemic neuronal degeneration
in red-haired Cocker spaniel dogs; signs commence at about 6 months of age with behavioral changes, gait and balance disorders, tremors, some seizures sufficient to warrant euthanasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two of the most utilized forms of intensive community-based treatment are functional family therapy (FFT) and multisystemic therapy (MST), which are both evidence-based practices and scientifically validated.
Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in farmed wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Rio Grande do Sul.
The effects of multisystemic therapy on diabetes stress among adolescents with chronically poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes: Findings from a randomized, controlled trial.
Swenson (Family Services Research Center, Medical University of South Carolina) details a proven approach to community-based intervention for at-risk youth, drawing on the methods of multisystemic therapy (MST).
In particular, the promising implications of Multisystemic Therapy (MST) for the treatment of New Zealand youth will be considered.
Through the utilization of a multisystemic format, a veritable safety net was built around the 16 students.
Microbial invasion of the fetus leads to a systemic inflammatory response with multisystemic involvement.
Brief, developmentally appropriate and empirically validated interventions such as GSC are viable alternatives to primary prevention, punitive criminal justice, or intensive multisystemic intervention strategies.
Multidimensional family therapy is the multisystemic family-focused treatment described in this manual for experienced family therapists that includes 12 weeks of in-clinic and telephone sessions working with individual adolescents and their families.
One promising approach to rehabilitating serious and violent offenders is multisystemic therapy (Henggeler, Melton, & Smith, 1992).