multistage carcinogenesis

multistage carcinogenesis

A general term referring to the development of cancer through multiple steps of oncogene activation and tumor suppressor inactivation. See One-hit, two-hit model, p53, Tumor.
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The classic and mechanistically groundbreaking studies on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are used to convey critical concepts on multistage carcinogenesis, including initiation, promotion, and progression.
Here we summarize recent Cr(VI)-induced human tumour, in vivo, cell culture and in vitro studies and put the data into context with three major paradigms of carcinogenesis: multistage carcinogenesis, genomic instability, and epigenetic modifications.
Three well-accepted general paradigms of carcinogenesis include multistage carcinogenesis, genomic instability, and epigenetic modification.
Multistage carcinogenesis is a multistep process which involves a series of cellular and molecular changes, as a result of the progressive accumulation of mutations and alterations in protooncogenes and tumour suppressor genes (26).
The mouse skin model of multistage carcinogenesis has demonstrated that cancer development results from the coordination of genetic mutation and alterations of epigenetic factors, including the machineries regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis (Hecker 1987; Zoumpourlis et al.
The modified multistage carcinogenesis model for SHE cell neoplastic progression is shown in Figure 1.
The goal of this work was to determine the rates of SHE cell division, death, senescence, and immortalization after exposure to arsenic, a known human carcinogen, and to evaluate the first stages of the modified multistage carcinogenesis model (Figure 1) for their ability to describe SHE cell growth dynamics.
Multistage carcinogenesis involves multiple genes and multiple mechanisms.
1) Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; (2) Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; (3) Unit of Multistage Carcinogenesis, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
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