multiple organ failure


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failure

 [fāl´yer]
inability to perform or to function properly.
adult failure to thrive a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a progressive functional deterioration of a physical and cognitive nature. The individual's ability to live with multisystem diseases, cope with ensuing problems, and manage his/her care are remarkably diminished.
bone marrow failure failure of the hematopoietic function of the bone marrow; see also bone marrow suppression.
congestive heart failure see congestive heart failure.
heart failure see heart failure.
kidney failure renal failure.
multiple organ failure failure of two or more organ systems in a critically ill patient; see also multiple organ failure.
renal failure see renal failure.
respiratory failure see respiratory failure.
failure to thrive (failure to thrive syndrome) physical and developmental retardation in infants and small children. The syndrome can be seen in children with a physical illness, but the term is most often taken to mean failure to thrive due to psychosocial effects such as maternal deprivation. The syndrome was first noticed when European psychiatrists studied the development of babies who had spent the first five years of their lives in institutions where they were deprived of the emotional warmth of a mother, father, or other primary caregiver.

Characteristics of the failure to thrive syndrome include lack of physical growth (for example, weight and height below the third percentile for age) and below normal achievement in fine and gross motor, social-adaptive, and language skills as assessed by psychometric testing using a tool such as the Denver Developmental Screening Test. Additionally, the child with this syndrome displays withdrawing behavior, avoidance of eye contact, and stiffness or flaccid posture when held. These children often have a history of irritability, feeding problems, and disturbed sleep patterns.

Parents of infants with failure to thrive syndrome typically display feelings of concern and inadequacy. The infant who is feeding poorly and is irritable may elicit a response in the caregiver that reflects tension and frustration. The need for comfort and nurturing by the infant may not be met, and this may lead to a cycle that exacerbates feeding problems.

Intervention encompasses identification of infants and mothers at risk for the syndrome and care of both mother or primary caregiver and infant. The major goals are to encourage the mother to express her feelings without fear of rejection, to model the role of mother and teach her nurturing behaviors, and to promote her self-esteem and confidence. Important nursing goals in the care of the infant include providing optimal nutrition, comfort, and rest; meeting the infant's psychosocial needs; and supplying emotional nurturance and sensory stimulation appropriate to the assessed developmental level.
ventilatory failure respiratory failure.

multiple

 [mul´tĭ-p'l]
manifold; occurring in various parts of the body at once.
multiple myeloma a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells in which the plasma cells proliferate and invade the bone marrow, causing destruction of the bone and resulting in pathologic fracture and bone pain. It is the most common type of monoclonal gammopathy, characterized by presence of a monoclonal immunoglobulin (immunoglobulin recognized as a single protein), Bence Jones proteins in the urine, anemia, and lowered resistance to infection. Called also plasma cell myeloma.

Diagnostic procedures to confirm suspected multiple myeloma include blood analyses, quantitative immunologic assays of serum and urine, urinalysis, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, and skeletal x-rays. Findings indicative of the disease are an increased number of plasma cells in the bone marrow (usually over 10 per cent of the total), anemia, hypercalcemia due to release of calcium from deteriorating bone tissue, and elevated blood urea nitrogen, Bence Jones protein in the urine, and osteolytic lesions that give the bone a honeycomb appearance on x-ray and lead to vertebral collapse.
Treatment. Treatment of multiple myeloma involves chemotherapy and radiation to relieve pain and manage the acute lesions of the spinal column. High-dose chemotherapy followed by blood cell rescue has shown some efficacy in certain situations. Individuals diagnosed with multiple myeloma who show no symptoms do not usually receive treatment.
Patient Care. Major problems presented by the patient with multiple myeloma are related to anemia, hypercalcemia, bone pain and pathologic fractures, and emotional distress created by trying to cope with the day-to-day physiologic and emotional aspects associated with the diagnosis of a malignant disease. The more common complications to be avoided are infection, renal failure, and the sequelae of spinal cord compression.

Transfusions with packed red blood cells can help alleviate and minimize some of the more severe symptoms of anemia. It is important that the patient be adequately hydrated to improve viscosity of the blood and circulation, to help avoid hypercalcemia, and to maintain kidney function for excretion of the products of protein metabolism. Continued ambulation and moderate exercise help slow down the loss of minerals, especially calcium, from the bones. Other problems are related to the administration of highly toxic antineoplastic drugs.
Multiple myeloma. Radiographs of the skull, ribs, and vertebrae show multiple punched out lesions. There is anemia secondary to bone marrow lesions that replace red blood cell precursors. Kidney failure is the most common cause of death. The urine contains Bence Jones protein. From Damjanov, 2000.
multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (multiple organ failure) failure of two or more organ systems in a critically ill patient because of a complex and interrelated series of events.
The pathogenesis of multiple organ failure. From Datex Medical Instrumentation, Inc., Tewksbury, MA.
multiple personality disorder dissociative identity disorder.
multiple-puncture test an intracutaneous test in which the material used (such as tuberculin) is introduced into the skin by pressure of several needles or pointed tines or prongs. This procedure is used in mass screenings, but it is not as accurate as other tests because of lack of precise measurement of the amount of medication actually entering the skin.
multiple sclerosis (MS) a chronic neurologic disease in which there are patches of demyelination scattered throughout the white matter of the central nervous system, sometimes extending into the gray matter. The disease primarily affects the myelin and not the nerve cells themselves; any damage to the neurons is secondary to destruction of the myelin covering the axon. The symptoms caused by these lesions are typically weakness, incoordination, paresthesias, speech disturbances, and visual disturbances, particularly diplopia. More specific signs and symptoms depend on the location of the lesions and the severity and destructiveness of the inflammatory and sclerotic processes.

The course of the disease is usually prolonged, with remissions and relapses over many years. Brief exacerbations, even with acute and severe symptoms, are thought to be the result of a transient inflammatory depression of neural transmission. Recovery occurs when there has been no permanent damage to the myelin sheath during the attack. Repeated attacks can, however, eventually permanently denude the axons and leave the yellow sclerotic plaques that are characteristic of the disease. Once the disease process reaches the stage of sclerosis the affected axons cannot recover and there is permanent damage.

The prevalence of MS is not certain because the disease is not one that is reported, and mild cases can be either misdiagnosed or never brought to the attention of a health care provider. It is far more common in the temperate zones of the world than in tropical and subtropical climates. The onset of symptoms most often occurs between the ages of 20 and 40 years, and the disease affects both sexes about equally.

The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown. It is likely that an inherited immune response is somehow responsible for the production of autoantibodies that attack the myelin sheath. Some authorities believe that infection by one of the slow viruses occurs during childhood and after some years of latency the virus triggers an autoimmune response. Others believe there is an antigen or environmental trigger for the disease.

The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is difficult because of the wide variety of possible clinical manifestations and the resemblance they bear to other neurological disorders. There is no definitive diagnostic test for the condition, but persons with objectively measured abnormalities of the central nervous system, a history of exacerbation and remission of symptoms, and demonstrable delayed blink reflex and evoked visual response are diagnosed as having either possible or probable multiple sclerosis. With time and progressive worsening of symptoms the diagnosis can become definite.
Treatment. A multidisciplinary approach is required to diagnose the condition and help patients and their families cope with the attendant problems. Multiple sclerosis has an impact on physical activity and life style, role, and interpersonal relationships; therefore, vocational guidance, counseling, and group therapy are helpful. It is important that the patient with severe disability maintain a positive attitude, focusing on functional abilities rather than disabilities. Regeneration of the damaged neural tissue is not possible but retraining and adaptation are. Stress due to trauma, infection, overexertion, surgery, or emotional upset can aggravate the condition and precipitate a flare-up of symptoms.

Supportive measures include a regimen of rest and exercise, a well-balanced diet, avoidance of extremes of heat and cold, avoidance of known sources of infection, and adaptation of a life style that is relatively unstressful while still being as productive as possible.

Therapeutic measures include medications to diminish muscle spasticity; measures to overcome urinary retention (such as credé's method or intermittent catheterization); speech therapy; and physical therapy to maintain muscle tone and avoid orthopedic deformities. Management of MS has been greatly enhanced by the availability of interferons beta-1a and beta-1b. Research support is strong that these medications reduce the frequency and severity of relapses.

Many multiple sclerosis patients and their families receive valuable support and encouragement from communication with others coping with the condition. A local chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society is within reach of most persons in the United States. Information and assistance in all phases of the disease are available by writing to The National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 733 Third Ave., 6th floor, New York, NY 10017, or consulting their web site at http://www.nmss.org.

multiple organ failure

A serious and life-threatening complication of patients with severe sepsis and systemic inflammation. There are indications that the aetiology of the condition involves the action of the immune system in combatting the microbial infection. It has been suggested that inappropriate activation and positioning of neutrophil polymorphs within the microvasculature may be an important factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
FDA to treat veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with multiple organ failure (Severe VOD) in recipients of stem cell transplants and Fast Track designation for the treatment of Severe VOD in recipients of stem cell transplants.
They both succumbed to multiple organ failure in the days following the attack on November 6, 2006, at the home they shared.
plant where the accident happened, was severely irradiated and died of multiple organ failure Dec.
Michael, aged 30, was found burning in a street in Edmonton, north London, and died in hospital of multiple organ failure 16 days later in February 1997.
Phase III clinical trial with Defibrotide for the treatment of Veno-Occlusive Disease (VOD) with Multiple Organ Failure (Severe VOD) as a complication of stem cell transplantation (SCT).
Patients with multiple organ failure and those who spent three or more days in intensive care had better outcomes at a similar or lower cost when treated at long-term acute care hospitals
Ryan Senior, 16, suffered multiple organ failure during keyhole surgery to find his undescended testicles after consultant surgeon Harish Chandran pierced a major vein, causing massive blood loss and cardiac arrest.
Sixty-seven-year-old Deshmukh passed away at a Chennai hospital on Tuesday afternoon from multiple organ failure.
Dr Kenneth Shorrock, a Home Office pathologist, told an inquest at Sutton Coldfield Town Hall, that Trooper Hall, from Dartmouth, Devon, died from multiple organ failure due to blast injuries.
The 34-year-old's life was cut tragically short when the flu bug took hold of her system, leading to pneumonia and eventually multiple organ failure.
Dr Anthony Birch, a consultant pathologist at the hospital, told the hearing the Mold pensioner died of multiple organ failure brought on by bronchial pneumonia and MRSA.
Reactivation of human herpesvirus type-6 in multiple organ failure syndrome.

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