multiphoton microscopy


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multiphoton microscopy

Abbreviation: MPM
A means of imaging tissues deep within the body by infrared fluorescence. The technique relies on the absorption of two photons directed into tissues by a pulsed infrared laser. It can be applied to the visualization of tissues beneath the body surface and to optical biopsy.
See also: microscopy
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References in periodicals archive ?
33) Multiphoton microscopy, on the other hand, generates high-resolution images revealing features similar to those observed in histologic images, without the need for exogenous contrast agents, and has an imaging depth of up to 500 [micro]m.
Multiphoton microscopy in the evaluation of human bladder biopsies.
Human bladder cancer diagnosis using Multiphoton microscopy.
Multiphoton microscopy is capable of distinguishing epithelial inflammatory cells, and between the components of the extracellular matrix (eg, collagen generates an SHG signal, whereas elastin is autofluorescent), without the use of any exogenous contrast agents.
Multiphoton microscopy of prostate and periprostatic neural tissue: a promising imaging technique for improving nerve-sparing prostatectomy.
2) High-resolution, apochromatic corrected, optimized for multiphoton microscopy water immersion objective:
In this article, we demonstrate the potential for clinical use of multiphoton microscopy, combined with simultaneous measurement of SHG, on clarified human tissue specimens with and without nuclear staining.
Multiphoton microscopy images of clarified normal human tissue.
Multiphoton microscopy images were collected within 4 hours of specimen collection to avoid structural degradation of the specimen.
These studies provide new impetus toward developing the multiphoton microscopy concept for endoscopic applications.
Multiphoton microscopy image sets examined using ITE signals alone from fresh tissue can provide high magnification, high-resolution images of fresh, human bladder biopsies, allowing a high degree of diagnostic accuracy.
Multiphoton microscopy, on the other hand, introduces no artifacts during processing, and subsequent FFPE H&E sections of MPM-imaged tissue are indistinguishable from non-MPM-imaged tissue.

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