multiinfarct dementia

multiinfarct dementia

[-infärkt′]
Etymology: L, multus + infarcire, to stuff, de, away, mens, mind
a form of organic brain disease characterized by the rapid deterioration of intellectual functioning, caused by vascular disease. Symptoms include emotional lability; disturbances in memory, abstract thinking, judgment, and impulse control; and focal neurological impairment, such as gait abnormalities, pseudobulbar palsy, and paresthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A VASCULAR or multiinfarct dementia is not the same as Alzheimer's.
Scientists once thought that multiinfarct dementia and other types of vascular dementia caused most cases of irreversible mental impairment.
Arteriosclerotic dementia as a concept had lacked clinical definition until 1974 when Hachinski et a1 (3) redescribed the dementia of multiple small-vessel infarcts and coined the term multiinfarct dementia.
A variant of multiinfarct dementia is Binswanger subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy in which the disease is confined to the white matter of the hemispheres and is usually reported as a fairly rapidly progre ssing dementia with significant neurologic and cognitive changes.
Alzheimer's or multiinfarct dementia may cause personality changes and progressive cognitive impairment.
Studies are under way to see how well these treatments work for patients with multiinfarct dementia.