moxibustion


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Related to moxibustion: cupping, mugwort

moxibustion

 [mok″sĭ-bus´chun]
counterirritation produced by igniting a cone or cylinder of moxa placed on the skin.

mox·i·bus·tion

(moks'ĭ-bŭs'chŭn),
Burning of herbal agents, such as moxa, on the skin as a counterirritant in the treatment of disease; a component of traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine.

moxibustion

/mox·i·bus·tion/ (mok″sĭ-bus´chun) the stimulation of an acupoint by the burning of a cone or cylinder of moxa placed at or near the point.

moxibustion

(mŏk′sĭ-bŭs′chən)
n.
The burning of moxa or other substances on the skin to treat diseases or to produce analgesia.

moxibustion

[mok′səbus′chən]
Etymology: Jpn, moe kusa, burning herb; L, comburere, to burn up
a method of producing analgesia or altering the function of a body system by igniting moxa, wormwood, or another combustible, slow-burning substance and holding it as near the point on the skin as possible without causing pain or burning. It is also sometimes used with acupuncture.

moxibustion

Chinese medicine
A type of acupuncture that uses heat, in which moxa, made from dried mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), is rolled into a pea-sized cone, placed point up and burned almost to the skin; the smouldering cone is extinguished after a few seconds, and the warmth passes into an acupuncture needle.

mox·i·bus·tion

(mok'sē-bŭs'chŭn)
Burning of herbal agents, such as moxa, on the skin as a counterirritant in the treatment of disease; a component of traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine.

moxibustion

A primitive form of treatment in which a cone of dried leaves is burned close to the skin. Apart from a minor local irritant effect in promoting an increased blood supply to the area, moxibustion is of no medical value and has no place in scientific medical practice.

Moxibustion

An acupuncture technique that burns the herb moxa or mugwort.
Mentioned in: Acupressure, Acupuncture

moxibustion (mˑ·ksi·bs·chn),

n a treatment similar to acupuncture in which
Artemis vulgaris leaves are burned on an acupuncture needle or directly on a point of the body.

mox·i·bus·tion

(mok'sē-bŭs'chŭn)
Burning of herbal agents, such as moxa, on the skin as a counterirritant in the treatment of disease.

moxibustion

(mok´sibus´chən),
n a method of producing analgesia or altering the function of a system of the body by igniting moxa, wormwood, or some other combustible, slow-burning substance and holding it as near the point on the skin as possible without causing pain or burning. It is also sometimes used in conjunction with acupuncture.

moxibustion

in traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture the use of a cone or cylinder of dried herbs is burned on or near the skin at acupuncture points to strengthen blood, stimulate qi and maintain general health.

Patient discussion about moxibustion

Q. I am in a confused state and wish to know about moxibustion and will this be of any help to me? I am taking acupuncture treatment for my insomnia. I had been benefitted to the minimum. They said it will make me have good sleep soon. I am still not able to sleep. It’s the 10th day of my treatment. Dissatisfied with the results the doctor changed medicine to Moxibustion. I am in a confused state and wish to know about moxibustion and will this be of any help to me?

A. Moxibustion is used as a combination therapy with acupuncture. Moxa is the dried mugwort from china. The burning moxa is a used on acupoints. It is of help in some, and its use is decided by the practitioner depending upon the requirements of the patient.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-_CXUXyKzQ&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v3-%5ECXUXyKzQ_stroke_survivor_story_meet_dr_edgely?q=confusion%20state&feature=player_embedded

Q. Burning people? My friend told me his brother had a back pain and he wanted to try a Chinese therapy, and the therapist burned him – is that possible? Isn’t it dangerous? Can it cause burns?

A. We don’t burn people – we use special burning plants to treat problems, and I never encountered a serious burn as a result of it, so actually it’s not really that dangerous as it sounds.

More discussions about moxibustion
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a variation of the more common Moxibustion therapy and is getting very popular in Singapore, particularly as part of a weight-loss regime.
So I started my own massage center in 1996, heeding Hata's advice," said Balami, who has also received acupuncture, acupressure and moxibustion training in Japan during his eight visits to the country so far.
Moxibustion is a form of fire heat treatment that stimulates specific acupuncture points of the body.
More recently, a study has been conducted on women's views on moxibustion for cephalic version in breech presentation (Mitchell & Allen, 2008) and a randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of yoga during pregnancy on maternal comfort, labour pain and birth outcomes (Chuntharapat, Petpichetchian, & Hatthakit, 2008).
Mr Young, who has set up charity Moxafrica, hopes to publish a research paper from results and attract interest for more substantial scientific work into the effect of moxibustion therapy, which uses the mugwort herb.
This can then be given a helping hand by moxibustion - burning a fragrant stick close to the needle to warm up a particular spot.
Webster technique, external version, acupuncture, acupressure, moxibustion.
Each entry gives the name description of the point, its features, position, method for locating, regional anatomy, acupuncture method, moxibustion method, the actions of the treatment, and indications for its use.
While our findings of decreased dyspnoea are similar to previous studies, direct comparison is not possible because previous studies investigated the effect of needle acupuncture, acupressure, and even moxibustion (burning of herbs over certain acupuncture points) (Jobst et al 1986) as part of the intervention.
Antispastic effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion in stroke patients.
In a chapter on health and medicine, Lane documents early Mongol medicinal practices, Chinese medicine, the use of acupuncture and moxibustion, bone-setting, and medical diagnoses.
Electroacupuncture may produce heart rhythm abnormalities in people with a pacemaker, and the fumes from moxibustion may worsen breathing in people with asthma.