film

(redirected from movie)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

film

 [film]
1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g., gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.
bite-wing film an x-ray film with a protruding tab to be held between the upper and lower teeth, used for a bite-wing radiograph of oral structures.
gelatin film, absorbable a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
spot film a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained either by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced. See also spot-film radiography.
x-ray film film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
Cross-sectional view of radiographic film. The bulk of the film is the base. The emulsion contains the diagnostic information. From Bushong, 2001.

film

(film),
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. A radiograph (colloq.).

film

(film)
1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin transparent sheet of cellulose acetate or similar material coated on one or both sides with an emulsion that is sensitive to light or radiation.

absorbable gelatin film  a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble sheet of gelatin, used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects, and as a local hemostatic.
bite-wing film  an x-ray film for radiography of oral structures, with a protruding tab to be held between the upper and lower teeth.
plain film  a radiograph made without the use of a contrast medium.
spot film  a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained either by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality or by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced.
x-ray film  film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.

film

(fĭlm)
n.
1. A light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or membranous coating.

film

Etymology: AS, filmen, membrane
1 a thin sheet or layer of any material, such as a coating of oil on a metal part.
2 (in photography and radiography) a thin, flexible transparent sheet of cellulose acetate or polyester plastic material coated with a light-sensitive emulsion, used to record images, such as organs, structures, and tissues, that may be involved in disease and diagnosis.

film

(film)
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. Colloquially, a radiograph.

film

(film)
1. Thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used for radiographs.
2. A radiograph (colloq.)

film

1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g. gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.

film badge
a radiographic film worn as a badge and used for detection and approximate measurement of radiographic exposure of personnel.
film changing device
enables the radiographer to change films quickly when a series of shots is being used, e.g. angiography.
copy film
film with a special reversal emulsion so that a contact print can be made with white light. Called also duplicating film.
dental film
nonscreen film used in dental radiography.
duplicating film
see copy film (above).
flat film
a film lacking in radiographic contrast.
gelatin film
a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
film label
details of the animal examined and when and where the examination took place. Usually made on the x-ray by photographic means or by using radiopaque tape.
film marker
any device, usually lead letters, placed on the film to indicate which part of the animal was examined and the projection used.
nonscreen film
film for getting very fine detail, used without a cassette and requiring long exposure time. This film is now banned in some parts of the world.
plain film
an x-ray film taken without contrast medium or other special effects. Often an exploratory or scout film.
spot film
a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained (1) by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or (2) by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced.
standard film
fine-grain, medium-speed with wide tolerance for exposure times.
x-ray film
film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twelve' (from the movie 12) -lyrics by Alessandra De Rossi, music and arrangement by Marc Abaya, interpreted by Alessandra De Rossi
He is also a movie critic with the Toronto Star and co-host of Reel to Real on Rogers television.
But now, in an unanticipated bonanza, we have been witnessing through the good offices of Celestial Pictures in Hong Kong a flood of digitally restored items from the Shaw Brothers catalogue, with the promise of many more to come: The library amounts to some eight hundred movies.
I heard that Milla Jovovich plays a mini in this movie.
Critical Thinking: What bothered people about the famous grapefruit scene in the movie The Public Enemy?
What do we learn in this movie about conversion, redemption, reconciliation, and forgiveness?
The job of a decent disaster movie isn't simply to give us villains, of course.
Beyond selectively seizing on economics and overlooking the motion-picture industry's relentless use of other media, the peremptory dismissal of TV-based movies shrugs off an even more elemental truth regarding any film adaptation, whether the source is TV or Tolstoy: The quality of a movie's source is ultimately unrelated to how it turns out on the screen.
Medved quickly caught on to the secret of success in the field of broadcast punditry: obsequious praise of movies with fat advertising budgets will land your name in big, splashy ads carried in newspapers across the country.
Dippy is the familiar comical movie psychiatrist--the one who is crazier or more foolish than his patients,' says Schneider.