mouth-to-mouth resuscitation


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Related to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation: cardiopulmonary resuscitation

resuscitation

 [re-sus″ĭ-ta´shun]
1. restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead, or whose respirations had ceased; see also artificial respiration.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administering emergency measures to sustain life.
cardiopulmonary resuscitation see cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
resuscitation: fetus in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administering emergency measures to improve placental perfusion or correct fetal acid-base status.
fluid resuscitation
1. the correction of fluid volume imbalances, especially in patients with burn injuries.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administering prescribed intravenous fluids rapidly.
mouth-to-mouth resuscitation a method of artificial respiration in which the rescuer covers the patient's mouth with his own and exhales vigorously, inflating the patient's lungs.
resuscitation: neonate in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administering emergency measures to support adaptation of the neonate to extrauterine life.

mouth-·to-·mouth re·sus·ci·ta·tion

mouth-to-mouth respiration (q.v.) employed as part of emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

(mouth′tə-mouth′)
n.
Rescue breathing in which one uses one's mouth to cover the victim's mouth and deliver air. Also called mouth-to-mouth ventilation.

mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

a procedure in artificial resuscitation, performed most often with cardiac massage. The victim's nose is sealed by pinching the nostrils closed, the head is extended, and air is breathed by the rescuer through the mouth into the lungs. See also cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

mouth-to-mouth re·sus·ci·ta·tion

(mowth-mowth rě-sŭs'i-tā'shŭn)
Mouth-to-mouth respiration employed as part of emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

Maintenance of an oxygen supply in a person unable to breath spontaneously by periodic inflation of the lungs by blowing into the mouth or nose. This is done 16 to 20 times a minute and is verified by watching the chest rise and fall. Also known as the ‘kiss of life’.
References in periodicals archive ?
In another case a woman became angry when she couldn't reach a shelf because an elderly man who had collapsed was being given mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
But she told how Mr Kerry leapt into the water, hooked the cage from beneath the water's surface with an oar and administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the tiny rodent.
Bystanders who want to help a heart attack victim are increasingly being told by 911 dispatchers to skip the mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and concentrate on giving chest compressions until medical help arrives.
A second rescue boat arrived and the rescuers took turns in administering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to Laura while she was underwater.
Unwitting Mrs Morgan was asked by Shipman to give murder victim Joan Harding, 82, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage to hide a lethal injection killing.
Mr Dale said yesterday he attempted mouth-to-mouth resuscitation before the emergency services arrived.
But a relieved Elaine Wood managed to drag helpless hound Ben to safety and give him mouth-to-mouth resuscitation after he got trapped in a current in rapid moving waters.
If you haven't been trained in CPR or are worried about giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a stranger who is unconscious and has no pulse, you can do chest compression (or just hands only) CPR: 1.
The teenager had recently completed a four-day paediatric first aid course and sprang into action, carrying out chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on 10-year-old Amanda Horse.
He gave Jackie mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, but had to take him to the hospital.
He added that he was concerned that a member of West Midlands Ambulance Service staff had advised Mr Davey's friend, Michael Smith, to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, despite the risk of him being poisoned.
Despite being given mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, the 60-year-old, from Talbot Road, Harton, South Shields, died due to a heart problem.