rescue breathing

(redirected from mouth-to-mouth)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to mouth-to-mouth: Mouth to mouth resuscitation

rescue breathing

n.
A technique used to resuscitate a person who has stopped breathing, in which the rescuer forces air into the victim's lungs at intervals of several seconds, usually by exhaling into the victim's mouth or nose or into a mask fitted over the victim's mouth.
Any of a number of life-saving manoeuvres in which a rescuer (R1) inflates the rescuee’s (R2) lungs by breathing into the R2’s airway access ‘port’; it is no longer considered optimal therapy for cardiac arrest. A 2006 report in Lancet compared CPR with and without rescue breathing and found a two-fold higher rate of survival in those who did not receive rescue breathing.
In early 2008, the American Heart Association changed its guidelines to include hands-only CPR, a new version using chest compressions only. Hands-only CPR is intended for untrained rescuers and only for witnessed cardiac arrest.

rescue breathing

Emergency medicine Any of a number of life-saving maneuvers in which a rescuer–R1 inflates the rescuee's–R2 lungs by breathing into the R2's airway access 'port'. See ABCs–of CPR, Head-tilt/Chin-lift maneuver.
Rescue breathing types
Mouth-to-mouth Airway is opened by the head-tilt/jaw-lift maneuver, nose is pinched by R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's mouth and gives 2 full breaths–1 to 1.5 seconds/breath, allows good chest expansion, average volume 800 mL
Mouth-to-nose Used when there is major trauma to the face, trismus, or a tight mouth seal cannot be formed; airway is opened by the head-tilt/jaw-lift maneuver, mouth is closed by R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's nose and gives 2 full breaths as above
Mouth-to-stoma Used in Pts who have undergone laryngectomy; R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's stoma and breathes as above  

head-tilt/chin-lift ma·neu·ver

(hĕd'tilt-chin'lift mă-nū'vĕr)
Basic procedure used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to open the patient's airway. Rescuers one hand tilts head back while other hand is placed under the chin to lift the mandible and displace the tongue.
Synonym(s): manual airway maneuver, rescue breathing.

head-tilt/chin-lift ma·neu·ver

(hĕd'tilt-chin'lift mă-nū'vĕr)
Basic procedure used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to open the patient's airway.
Synonym(s): manual airway maneuver, rescue breathing.

breathing

the alternate inspiration and expiration of air into and out of the lungs (see also respiration).

costal breathing
see costal respiration.
intermittent positive-pressure breathing (IPPB)
the active inflation of the lungs during inspiration under positive pressure from a cycling valve.
periodic breathing
rescue breathing
artificial ventilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "If I'd felt a pulse, if the patient had been breathing, I would have stopped mouth-to-mouth.
Robert made sure Eve's airway was clear but she then stopped breathing and he had to give her mouth-to-mouth.
All we found in there was a few boxes of plasters and a mask to put over the patient's face if we had to give mouth-to-mouth but it had no connection.
When I saw that she wasn't breathing I panicked and tried giving mouth-to-mouth and chest compressions but none of that worked, so I phoned the ambulance and they came within 10 minutes.
O'Neill then began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and after 90 seconds the girl opened her eyes.
But if I see [someone] drowning, I'll be straight in - well, I'll send someone else in- and then I'll do the mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
The pattern for resuscitating is "C-A-B;" that is, first focus on circulation via chest compressions, then on opening the airway and lastly on mouth-to-mouth breathing.
The lungs and blood of most heart-attack victims already have enough oxygen, making mouth-to-mouth unnecessary.
But training in how to give both chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth breaths is the best option, experts say.
David Boland, 39, gave his nine-year-old son Rowan mouth-to-mouth.
Head custodian Tristian Jones gave the German visitor mouth-to-mouth resuscitation after he fell ill on a visit to the World Heritage site last week.