mounting

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mount·ing

(mownt'ing),
In dentistry, the laboratory procedure of attaching the maxillary and/or mandibular cast to an articulator.

mounting

[mount′ing]
the preparation of specimens and slides for study.

mount

Device (usually in metal or plastic) which holds the ophthalmic lenses before the eyes in rimless spectacles or in spectacles with rims, but which do not surround the lenses, the latter being held by holes, slots or grooves in their periphery. Syn. mounting.

mount·ing

(mownt'ing)
In dentistry, laboratory procedure of attaching maxillary and/or mandibular cast to an articulator.

mounting,

n the laboratory procedure of attaching the maxillary or mandibular cast to an articulator or similar instrument.
mounting board,
n a jig used in mounting the maxillary cast on the top articulator frame. The mounting board enables the dental professional to determine the patient's axis so that the maxillary cast can be positioned accurately.
mounting, split cast,
n a cast with the margins of its base or capital beveled or grooved to permit accurate remounting on an articulator. Split remounting metal plates may be used instead of beveling or grooving in the casts.

mounting

see mount.

mounting behavior
the placement of the forequarters over the hindquarters of another animal, as occurs in mating. Seen particularly in pet dogs that mount other dogs, male or female, humans or sometimes objects. Usually considered unacceptable behavior by owners.
inappropriate mounting
commonly seen in puppies, but occasionally continues into adulthood. Commonly a displacement activity, in response to conflict or excitement.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 1990 study found a 50 percent improvement in mounting behavior in 60 percent of dogs, and a 90 percent improvement in as many as 40 percent of dogs following castration.
With both young and mature dogs, you can use time-outs to let your dog know that mounting behavior makes all fun stop.
Be ready to intervene if you see the beginning signs of mounting behavior in your dog.
When you see the first glimmerings of mounting behavior, try subtle body-blocking.
Cows and sows will express male mounting behavior when treated chronically with testosterone.
Dogs that become very aroused or excited during play may exhibit mounting behavior.
When you see his excitement levels increasing, initiate a sit/stay until he calms down, thus heading off the mounting behavior.
If they are spayed, the balancing effect of estrogen is removed; this may lead to mounting behaviors in some dogs.
Because the testicles still produce testosterone, the normal mitigating effect of neutering on mounting behaviors would be negated.